2019 Vermont Organics Recycling Summit

Randolph Center, Vermont
Thursday, April 11, 2019

8:15 am  Registration, Continental Breakfast, Exhibitors

9:00 am  Opening Remarks
             
 Emily Boedecker, Commissioner, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation

               State of the State
               Josh KellyMaterials Management Section Chief, ANR, Solid Waste Program

9:30 am  Keynote
               Frank Franciosi is the Executive Director of the US Composting Council.

10:15 am  Break

10:45 am  Morning Workshops (descriptions below)
M1. Composting Methods and Nutrient Implications
Juan Alvez, UVM Extension, Center for Sustainable Agriculture
Biran Jerose, Agrilab Technologies, Inc.
Charles Smith, Full Circle

M2. Getting Scrappy! Food Scrap Diversion Options for Residents
Athena Lee Bradley, Windham Solid Waste Management District
Kathleen Gent, Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District
Cassandra Hemenway, Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District
Megan Kolbay, Earthgirl Composting
James McSweeney, Compost Technical Services

M3. 
Municipal Contracts for Solid Waste and Food Scrap Collection and Composting
Peter Gaskill, Triple T Trucking
Patrick Moreland, City of Brattleboro
Bob Spencer, Windham Solid Waste Management District

M4. Storm Water Projects: Getting Designers and Producers on the Same Page
Jen Baer, Green Mountain Compost
Kevin Burke, VT DEC Stormwater Program
Marc Companion, Lake Champlain Sea Grant Institute, UVM, and VT DEC
Dave Wheeler, Assistant Stormwater Superintendent, South Burlington

12:15 pm  Lunch, Table Topics (optional), Exhibitors

Community Composting Training, from 1:15-3:15 (by Athena Lee Bradley)
NOTE: This year we are offering an afternoon side-event for an additional fee of $10 for VORS participants and $25 for those not participating in VORS.


1:45 pm  Afternoon Workshops (descriptions below)

A1. Composting, Soil Health and Climate Change 
Juan Alvez, UVM Extension, Center for Sustainable Agriculture
Cat Buxton, Grow More, Waste Less
Didi Pershouse

A2. Creatively Combating Contamination
Elly Ventura, Lamoille Regional Solid Waste Management District

A3. Haulers' Roundtable: Exploring De-Packaging and a Regional Approach to Organics Diversion
Dan Bell, Agri-Cycle
Ben Harvey, E.L. Harvey & Sons, Inc.
Lisa Ransom, Grow Compost of Vermont

A4. Storm Water Projects: Getting Designers and Producers on the Same Page
Jason Booth, A&E Engineering
Marc Companion, Lake Champlain Sea Grant Institute, UVM, and VT DEC
Chuck Duprey, Naturcycle, Inc.
Becky Tharp, Watershed Consulting

3:15 pm  Ice Cream Social, VTC Digester Tour, Compost Blowing Demo by Surf&Turf Landscape, Exhibitors, Raffle

4:00 pm  Adjourn



Workshop Descriptions  
M1. Composting Methods and Nutrient Implications
In this session you’ll hear from three presenters about different composting methods and feedstocks, and the associated nutrient implications. Learn how compost aeration and forced air drying with heat recovered from the composting process can be used to stabilize and add value to phosphorus materials such as concentrate and centrifuge cake. Understand the difference in nutrient profiles and biological activity of eight different composts sources (Dairy, Beef, Sheep, Commercial, Homestead, Residential and Johnson-Su) and the potential economic contribution of the resulting compost. Discover how anaerobic fermentation reduces the need for carbon supplements and how the microbes behind this process facilitate carbon and nitrogen fixation while increasing the bioavailability of soil nutrients.

M2. Getting Scrappy! Food Scrap Diversion Options for Residents 
This panel discussion will explore the language of “convenient options” in Act 148 and what this means for residents across Vermont in terms of complying with the landfill ban on organics that will come into full effect in 2020. The panel will feature people in various fields related to residential food scrap diversion, including backyard composting education and outreach, community/ neighborhood compost sites, connecting food scrap drop-offs to farms, and curbside hauling. We'll consider the opportunities and challenges of the different options, and explore education and outreach models required when initiating wide-spread behavior change. The goal of the panel discussion will be to illuminate the various ways different entities around the state are setting up infrastructure to meet the needs of Vermont’s residents in food scrap management.

M3. Municipal Contracts for Solid Waste and Food Scrap Collection and Composting  
This session explores opportunities and challenges of municipal contracted solid waste service with food scrap collection. Topics to be covered include: RFPs for solid waste services, contract templates for haulers and composters, education programs for residents, tracking organics diversion, and economic evaluations of the program.

M4. Storm Water Projects: Getting Designers and Producers on the Same Page  
Over the course of two sessions, we will share perspectives from designers, compost producers and regulators about integrating compost and compost-based products into stormwater management projects. The morning session will provide an overview of the organic requirements in the 2017 Stormwater Management Manual to start a conversation about the current specifications, some gaps and issues, and new guidance. The afternoon session will consider the same issues from the design and implementation side, and will cover topics such as best management practices, considerations for bioretention and gravel wetland specs, sourcing materials, and cost analysis. Please check out these two recent webinars related to phosphorus and compost use in stormwater management!

Community Composting Training, from 1:15-3:15 (by Athena Lee Bradley)
This year we are offering an afternoon side-event, additional fee of $10 for VORS participants and $25 for those not participating in VORS.

Community composting takes place on a scale larger than home composting but smaller than commercial or industrial composting. These sites can be managed by volunteers, community groups, social enterprises or local governments. Community composting programs successfully manage food scraps and other organics within a community, allowing for local control. The programs present scalable food diversion options that are applicable to virtually any community, whether urban, suburban, or rural. Operations can serve as demonstration or training sites, and/or serve as effective solutions for initiating food scrap processing. An essential role that community composting performs is educating and involving residents in learning about food scrap diversion, the benefits of composting, and the uses of compost products. See the full agenda.

A1. Composting, Soil Health and Climate Change
Soil is the glue that holds our landscape and our communities together. The soil carbon sponge is a critical component of adapting to our changing climate and mitigating the effects of flooding and drought. Composting food waste, yard waste and manure offer possibility in jumpstarting biological activity in our yards, fields and forests. We’ll discuss the connections between compost, soil, water, food and climate and offer practical solutions and opportunities for attendees to deepen knowledge and join the citizen movement to heal our ecosystems.

A2. Creatively Combating Contamination  
This presentation will describe the process of creating a brand from nothing. With no background in marketing or graphic design, the brand design process was intimidating. Utilizing outstanding local businesses and a team of thinkers, the process was pleasant and successful. The hard work in the beginning has continued to provide leverage and benefits to our organics program. Contamination has been extremely low since our program has existed. All spokes of the communication wheel will be highlighted in this presentation as well.

A3. Haulers' Roundtable: Exploring De-Packaging and a Regional Approach to Organics Diversion
Join us to for an open discussion about new or current practices in organics hauling.  We’ve invited food scrap haulers that can speak to organics recycling through de-packaging, digestion, and organics hauling collection.

A4. Storm Water Projects: Getting Designers and Producers on the Same Page  
Over the course of two sessions, we will share perspectives from designers, compost producers and regulators about integrating compost and compost-based products into stormwater management projects. The morning session will provide an overview of the organic requirements in the 2017 Stormwater Management Manual to start a conversation about the current specifications, some gaps and issues, and new guidance. The afternoon session will consider the same issues from the design and implementation side, and will cover topics such as best management practices, considerations for bioretention and gravel wetland specs, sourcing materials, and cost analysis. Please check out these two recent webinars related to phosphorus and compost use in stormwater management!

 

Contact Information

Payment Instructions

  • Registration Fees:
    Early Bird (through March 15)
    : $55
    Attendee:  $65
    Attendee (CAV Member):  $50
    Exhibitor: $200
    Exhibitor (after March 23rd):  $250
    Presenter:  Fee Waived
    Confirmed Volunteer: Contact Natasha for more information on being a volunteer

    Note:  If you choose to pay at the event, cash or check is preferred.  Thank you!

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