Knowledge for Equity Conference

Silver Spring, Maryland
Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Welcome: Dr. J. Nadine Gracia- Office of Minority Health

J. Nadine Gracia, MD, MSCE is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health (Acting) and the Acting Director of the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The Office of Minority Health is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities. A pediatrician with epidemiology training, Dr. Gracia has served in academic medicine and government. From 2010 to 2011, she was the Chief Medical Officer for the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH). She provided programmatic and policy leadership and coordination of a portfolio that included child and adolescent health, climate change, disaster preparedness, environmental health, global health, Haiti recovery, and the White House Council on Women and Girls. Most recently, she led the development of HHS's  2012 environmental justice strategy, which addresses the disproportionate exposure of minority and low-income communities and Indian tribes to environmental hazards and promotes healthy community environments. In 2008-2009, Dr. Gracia was one of fourteen White House Fellows and was assigned to HHS, where she worked in OASH and the Office of the Secretary. During the last two months of the fellowship, she was a policy advisor in the Office of the First Lady, assisting in the development of the childhood obesity initiative. Previously, Dr. Gracia was a clinical instructor and general pediatrics research fellow at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, conducting research on community risk factors for violence. She received a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania and a medical degree from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Gracia completed pediatrics residency and served as Chief Pediatrics Resident at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. She is board-certified in pediatrics and is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Gracia is an advocate for minority and vulnerable populations and lectures nationwide on health disparities and children's health. She is a National President Emeritus of the Student National Medical Association and a past Postgraduate Physician Trustee of the National Medical Association. A first-generation Haitian-American, Dr. Gracia earned a Bachelor of Arts with Honors in French at Stanford University.

Plenary Speaker: Dr. Stephen Thomas, University of Maryland

Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D. is professor of Health Services Administration in the School of Public Health and Founding Director of the Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland in College Park. One of the nation’s leading scholars on minority health and health disparities, Dr. Thomas has applied his expertise to address cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and HIV/AIDS. As a member of the Health Disparity Workgroup to the Maryland Health Quality and Cost Council he made significant contributions to the final report and recommendations including, but not limited to, the call for establishment of Health Enterprise Zones and creation of a Maryland Health Innovation Prize. He is a member of the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange Navigator Advisory Committee, assisting the state implement provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Recognized by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, he received the Inaugural 2011 Shirley Nathan-Pulliam Health Equity Leadership Award. At the national level he received the 2005 David Satcher Award from the Directors of Health Promotion and the 2004 Alonzo Smyth Yerby Award from the Harvard School of Public Health for his work with people suffering the health effects of poverty. A leading scholar on the legacy of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (1932-1972), Dr. Thomas was an invited White House guest to witness the Presidential Apology to Survivors of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee on May 16, 1997. He is principal investigator of an NIH-NIMHD Center of Excellence on Race, Ethnicity and Health Disparities Research with Dr. Sandra C. Quinn. After completing his undergraduate degree in school health education at The Ohio State University, Dr. Thomas went on to earn his master’s degree in health education at Illinois State University and later earned his doctorate in community health education from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. A champion of translating medical science and public health practice into community based interventions, he believes now is the time for “less talk and more action” to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities to achieve health equity for all.

Day 1: November 13th, 2012

Data Makes a Difference: Practical Tips for Using Data to Address Health Disparities (Register for Part A in the morning session and Part B in afternoon)

The purpose of this workshop is to help participants find, understand, interpret, and use data to support their work to eliminate health disparities. The intended audience for this workshop includes members, staff, or volunteers of the community-based organizations who have had no or little exposure to data and are seeking to develop basic knowledge about data related to health disparities. Using a common scenario, a trainer will guide participants through steps needed in a process to use data to address a specific health disparity. Throughout the workshop, the trainer will pose questions to guide participants' critical thinking about data. Participants will also learn strategies to ensure the entire process of data access, interpretation, and use serves to strengthen participants' efforts to bring their own community together to address health disparities.

Kien Lee, Ph.D., Principal Associate, Community Science

Dr. Lee directs, manages and provides research, evaluation, and other types of technical support to national and local community change initiatives. She has directed and implemented evaluations on institutional capacity building, intergroup relations, immigrant integration and cultural competency, as well as led numerous community and organizational assessments. She has worked with community-based organizations to transform research into practical knowledge to inform their change strategies. She has presented at national conferences on evaluating and providing capacity building support to cross-cultural community efforts. She was the recipient, along with David Chavis, of the 2002 Outstanding Evaluation Award from the American Evaluation Association. She is widely published and a sought after speaker in areas including immigration integration and cross-culturally competent evaluation.

Mapping Our Voices for Equality - Using Online Maps and Stories as a Tool to Promote Health Equity

This session will introduce participants to Mapping Our Voices for Equality, (MOVE) a grassroots community engagement strategy leveraging digital stories, online mapping, and face-to-face organizing to influence policy, systems, and environmental change.  Participants will learn how communities disproportionately impacted by policy decisions in King County, Washington, have gained the capacity to produce, disseminate, and utilize culturally and linguistically relevant digital stories and other forms of community-produced data to increase equity. 

Natasha Freidus, Creative Narrations Co-Director and Mapping Our Voices for Equality Project Manager

Natasha Freidus is MOVE’s project manager and the founder and co-director of Creative Narrations, a consulting firm specializing in digital storytelling for social change. Natasha’s interest in storytelling is rooted in her background in adult education and community organizing. She has conducted workshops in multimedia narrative for diverse groups throughout the country and internationally.  Natasha earned her Masters degree in Urban Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has served as adjunct faculty at M.I.T., University of Massachusetts, and Universitat of Rovira I Virgili.

 

Martha Zuñiga

Martha Zuñiga is  a MOVE community advocate and digital storytelling trainer. Martha was born in Chihuahua, Mexico, where she graduated in communication sciences from U.A.C.J. She has been a professional educator in public and private settings for more than ten years, with extensive experience in social media through radio and television, and is qualified in health education and disease prevention for  HIV/AIDS and tobacco cessation. Martha is program specialist at Entre Hermanos, writes articles for the Seattle Gay News and is an anchor for Radio Entérate a weekly radio’s Spanish talk show.

Getting Equity Advocacy Results:  GEAR for Improvement, GEAR for Learning

Advocacy – the art of influence and persuasion – is essential for fostering the creation, adoption, and implementation of promising policy solutions that catalyze social change. Building on the experiences and expertise of seasoned staff and partners in health equity and a range of other fields, PolicyLink has identified the essential components of successful equity advocacy for policy change.  This information has been assembled in Getting Equity Advocacy Results (GEAR):  a suite of benchmarks, methods, and tools for advocates, organizers, and their allies to track the results of campaigns.   The workshop will introduce the GEAR framework and benchmarks, so that community leaders can develop effective ways to measure, assess and document their progress.

Victor Rubin, PhD -Vice President for Research PolicyLink

Victor Rubin is Vice President for Research at PolicyLink, a national research and action institute dedicated to advancing social and economic equity.  He has 30 years of experience as a community planner, consultant, program evaluator, university researcher, and teacher. His masters and doctorate are in City and Regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley. He recently coauthored a report on how community-based research can contribute to policy change, and serves on a number of state and national advisory committees concerned with the scholarship of engagement and the creation of information systems to track the progress of community-based initiatives.

 

Jme McLean, MCP, MPH - Senior Associate PolicyLink

Jme McLean is a Senior Associate at PolicyLink, a national research and action institute advancing economic and social equity.  At PolicyLink, McLean works across a range of projects to support healthy, sustainable communities at the national, regional, and local levels.  Her work includes leadership on Getting Equity Advocacy Results (GEAR), a suite of tools and resources developed for grassroots advocates to plan and assess the success of equity advocacy. She also provides strategic guidance and technical assistance to philanthropic organizations across the country to create health equity through funding and policy strategies, including advocacy and policy evaluation.   McLean recently worked in Richmond, CA, as an intermediary between city and county government agencies, community-based organizations, and other partners working to innovate urban planning policy for health; this included efforts to develop data systems to improve health environments for low-income people and communities of color.  She holds a dual masters in urban planning and public health from the University of California – Berkeley.

The Social Determinants of Health: Making the Most of the American Community Survey

Health is associated with socioeconomic status (i.e. income, poverty, education, marital status).  The American Community Survey (ACS) is a potentially powerful tool in identifying populations and geographic areas with health disparities.  Although publicly available, many users find harnessing the power of ACS data challenging.   Workshop attendees will learn about the differences between Census geographies, ACS datasets, selecting appropriate variables related to the social determinants of health, and establishing baseline and trend measures to develop visually appealing results.

Stephen Borders, PhD, MSHP, Associate Professor and Research Fellow, Community Research Institute, Grand Valley State University

Stephen Borders is a Research Fellow at the Community Research Institute and Associate Professor in the School of Public and Nonprofit Administration at Grand Valley State University.   He has an extensive history in public health and working with non-profit organizations with needs assessments and community indicators.  Among his recent work is the development the Health Transportation Shortage Index with the Children’s Health Fund to identify areas where children are likely to have transportation barriers to primary health care services.   He also recently completed a community indicators project to provide baseline measures for early childhood services in Kent County, MI. 

Understanding Health Disparities among People with Disabilities: Core Health Indicators

Health disparities exist between people with and without disabilities on leading indicators of health such as obesity, smoking, physical activity, access to dental services, mammography use, and reported overall health status.  Many funded programs show promise in helping to improve the health of people with disabilities.  This workshop will begin by presenting updated information from a national webinar presented on 1/24/2012 that provided an overview of the problem along with a discussion of potential promising practices and strategies intended to reduce disability health disparities.  An example of a chart book created with national data will be provided.  Participants will then be led through a community concerns report exercise in which issues are identified by workshop participants and subsequently scored for their importance and satisfaction with how they are being addressed at their community level.  The workshop will conclude by illustrating how to use the scores compiled in order to identify greatest strengths and greatest problems/priorities, and ways in which these scores can be used as an agenda setting device.  The main objectives of the session are to increase awareness of data and resources associated with health disparities for people with disabilities, provide an example of an easy-to-use data report, and use active learning strategies to engage workshop participants in a process that they may find helpful in assessing the relative importance of factors contributing to health disparities among people with disabilities in their communities.

Michael H. Fox, ScD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Dr. Fox is the Associate Director for Science in the Division of Human Development and Disability, joining the CDC in October, 2009.  He received his BS in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin and an MS in Studies in Behavioral Disabilities from the University of Wisconsin, teaching special education for four years before completing another MS in Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology from the Medical College of Wisconsin.  After working as the MIS Director of an HMO in Milwaukee, he went on to complete his doctorate in Health Policy and Management from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He was a senior administrator with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene from 1989 – 1995, joining the faculty at the University of  Kansas in 1995 and retiring as a full professor under phased retirement at the time he joined the CDC.  His research domains have been in areas of health system change, program evaluation of state programs for the under-served, and disability policy, with a focus on Medicaid, disability measurement, ADA impact, health consumerism, disaster planning for people with disabilities, and health disparities, including obesity. His article on which he was lead author, “The Psychosocial Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Persons with Disabilities and Independent Living Center Staff Living on the American Gulf Coast,” published in Rehabilitation Psychology in August, 2010, was voted research paper of the year by the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA).

 

Kimberly G. Phillips, University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability

Ms. Phillips conducts research and evaluation at the University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability.  She is pursuing her doctoral degree (ABD) in psychology, with a focus on qualitative and quantitative methods.  She works with both local and national data sets, and she provides training and technical assistance to program partners at state agencies and in the community.  Ms. Phillips also serves as the project coordinator for New Hampshire’s cooperative agreement with CDC/NCBDDD/DHDD to improve statewide initiatives regarding disability and public health.

Engaging the Grassroots Community with Your Health Equity Data

This workshop will explore engaging the communities most affected by the issues in the process of gathering and using your health equity data. Building on the experience as a consultant with ten REACH 2010 sites of the Boston Public Health Commission’s (BPHC) Center for Health Equity and Social Justice, the trainer will share the BPHC model, the struggles that communities had, and successful solutions through stories and tools. The workshop will alternate between didactic material, actual community examples, and experiential exercises that will allow participants to explore the issues.

Tom Wolff, Ph.D., Tom Wolff & Associates

Dr. Wolff is a community psychologist committed to issues of social justice and building healthy communities through collaborative solutions. A nationally recognized consultant on coalition building and community development, he has a lifetime of experience training and consulting. His clients include federal, state, and local government agencies; foundations; hospitals; nonprofit organizations; professional associations; and grassroots communities across North America. He has consulted for the Boston Public Health Commission for the last four years helping them develop their health equity coalitions. Tom’s  recent book The Power of Collaborative Solutions – Six principles and effective tools for building health communities was published by Jossey Bass in  2010.

Drawing Conclusions from Data and Presenting Them to Others

This session is for participants who are novices at dealing with data.  It will teach the basics on how to accurately interpret graphs and charts of quantitative data related to health disparities and the social determinants of health, and to present conclusions to other individuals and groups.  The session will also cover the purposes of communicating these data to other groups as part of strategies to end health disparities.  Participants will then be asked to identify key characteristics of likely audiences, and strategize ways for identifying what pieces of the data are the most important for them to understand and how to present the data in clear and meaningful ways.

Rosalie T. Torres, Ph.D.  Principal, Torres Consulting Group

Dr. Torres is president of Torres Consulting Group, a research, evaluation and management consulting firm specializing in the feedback-based development of programs and organizations. Formerly, she was the Director of Research, Evaluation, and Organizational Learning at the Developmental Studies Center (DSC), an educational non-profit based in Oakland, CA. She earned her Ph.D. in research and evaluation in 1989 from the University of Illinois. Over the past 27 years, she has conducted more than 60 evaluations in education, business, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations, serving in both internal and external evaluator roles. She has authored/co-authored numerous books and articles articulating practice-based theories of evaluation use; the relationship between evaluation and individual, team, and organizational learning; and communicating and reporting evaluation findings. Among them are two books from Sage Publications: Evaluation Strategies for Communicating and Reporting: Enhancing Learning in Organizations, 2nd edition (Torres, Preskill, & Piontek, 2005), and Evaluative Inquiry for Learning in Organizations (Preskill & Torres, 1999).

Connecting to Maps, Data, and Peer Learning on Community Commons

This session will provide workshop participants with a basic understanding of the tools and resources available on Community Commons. The session will address the following topics:

  • Data Visualization
  • Interpreting and Using Data for Strategy Development and Improvement
  • Accessing Existing Data

 The main objectives for this session include:

  • What is the Map of the Movement and how can I use it?
  • How can I engage in peer learning on the Commons?
  • How can I access and use data?
  • Where can I get help?
Jamie Kleinsorge – Institute for People, Place, and Possibility - Community Commons Team MemberJamie Lynn Kleinsorge is a Project Manager for Community Initiatives (CI) and brings expertise in rural community development, civic engagement, direct action organizing, social networking and non-profit management.  She currently manages content curation, online learning, and social media for the Community Commons and serves as the primary administrator for CI’s Communities Putting Prevention to Work Technical Assistance contract.Jamie received her Master of Science in Rural Sociology with an emphasis in Community Development from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Prior to attending the University of Missouri, she worked as a Community Development Specialist for the Illinois Coalition for Community Services. Jamie received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Western Illinois University.  Jamie lives in Columbia, MO with her husband Dan and their dog Otto. She also is a skater for the CoMo Derby Dames.


Community-driven Health Equity:  Presentation of the THRIVE Framework and Indicators to Support Local Action

THRIVE helps to enable community-driven efforts to address community health and health equity.  The approach translates health equity knowledge into community action by prescribing a process to 1) develop a shared understanding between community members, health practitioners, community based advocacy/service organizations, and community members about the linkages between the clinical health outcomes, exposures and behaviors, and how these are socially/environmentally determined, 2) assessing the current state of the determinants of health as related to their impacts on health equity, 3) translating the assessment output into an action plan for improving health and health equity, and 4) determining appropriate locally available and published indicators to measuring progress.

Xavier Morales, Ph.D..- Program Manager at Prevention Institute

Xavier Morales, Ph.D., works in the areas of promoting health equity and preventing violence. He manages the Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments (THRIVE) initiative and is also a manager for Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth (UNITY). Xavier has extensive experience in community-led prevention initiatives including youth development, workforce/employment development, education/college access programming, prisoner reentry, alternatives to detention, community development, and art focused recovery and rehabilitation programs. He also has a strong track record authoring/designing proposals to support community-led prevention initiatives as well as experience conducting evaluations for federal, state, local and foundation supported programs. Xavier's current focus is working with multi-sectoral community-led collaborations to address social determinants of health inequity and to prevent violence. Xavier received his Ph.D. and Master's degrees in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University and his B.A. in Environmental Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Menaka Mohan, MCRP, MPH

Menaka Mohan, MCRP, MPH, Program Coordinator at Prevention Institute, works in the area of health equity and supports the development of the Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments (THRIVE) initiative. She also supports the preventing violence team. She works with local community groups, public health departments, and federal agencies to provide training, technical assistance, and consultation to develop strategies that create healthier and more equitable communities. Prior to joining Prevention Institute in 2011, Menaka worked at Active Living By Design as a graduate assistant where she supported the Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC) grant-making process and developed resource guides to help HKHC grantees change the built environment to promote healthy eating and active living. Before working at Active Living By Design, Menaka worked at Sustainable South Bronx where she organized everything from walking clubs and social marketing campaigns to coalition-based political advocacy and land use planning strategies related to a proposed highway decommissioning and a new greenway system in the South Bronx. Menaka received her Master’s degree in Public Health with an emphasis in Health Education and Health Behavior, and a Master’s in City and Regional Planning with a focus on transportation from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Day 2: November 14, 2012

Data Makes a Difference: Practical Tips for Using Data to Address Health Disparities (Register for Part A in the morning session and Part B in afternoon)

The purpose of this workshop is to help participants find, understand, interpret, and use data to support their work to eliminate health disparities. The intended audience for this workshop includes members, staff, or volunteers of the community-based organizations who have had no or little exposure to data and are seeking to develop basic knowledge about data related to health disparities. Using a common scenario, a trainer will guide participants through steps needed in a process to use data to address a specific health disparity. Throughout the workshop, the trainer will pose questions to guide participants' critical thinking about data. Participants will also learn strategies to ensure the entire process of data access, interpretation, and use serves to strengthen participants' efforts to bring their own community together to address health disparities.

Rosalie T. Torres, Ph.D.  Principal, Torres Consulting Group

Dr. Torres is president of Torres Consulting Group, a research, evaluation and management consulting firm specializing in the feedback-based development of programs and organizations. Formerly, she was the Director of Research, Evaluation, and Organizational Learning at the Developmental Studies Center (DSC), an educational non-profit based in Oakland, CA. She earned her Ph.D. in research and evaluation in 1989 from the University of Illinois. Over the past 27 years, she has conducted more than 60 evaluations in education, business, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations, serving in both internal and external evaluator roles. She has authored/co-authored numerous books and articles articulating practice-based theories of evaluation use; the relationship between evaluation and individual, team, and organizational learning; and communicating and reporting evaluation findings. Among them are two books from Sage Publications: Evaluation Strategies for Communicating and Reporting: Enhancing Learning in Organizations, 2nd edition (Torres, Preskill, & Piontek, 2005), and Evaluative Inquiry for Learning in Organizations (Preskill & Torres, 1999).


Community Assets on A Map: Facilitating a Community-Engaged Mapping Exercise

This workshop introduces community research concepts, through the framework of Community Based Participatory Action Research and mapping. Community-Engaged Mapping is a group mapping activity that provides organizations with the opportunity to generate a shared understanding of community issues, visually represent community knowledge, and empower community members to engage in active decision-making and advocacy. Using our Community Research Lab’s Participatory Asset Mapping Toolkit and exercises, participants will learn how to facilitate a Community‚ÄźEngaged Mapping activity with community members to map local assets.

Deanna Cooke Ph.D., Senior Manager for Organizational Learning and Development Advancement Project

Dr. Cooke is a community psychologist with over 10 years of experience in training and supporting faculty, students, and community organizations in conducting community-based participatory research. Most recently, her work at Advancement Project includes working with the Community Research Lab, where she has conducted trainings and workshops on community-based participatory action research and community asset mapping for community-based organizations in California.


What Are You Really Trying to Change? Determining Your Local Conditions

Communities are faced with affecting long term outcomes of reducing health disparities, but they have to start somewhere. Small things change first, whether they are enforcement practices, business programs, community policies or community reactions. But how do we know where to start and what do these local conditions look like and how do we take this information to determine the right things to address? Data for local conditions exist in all communities. Health disparities occur for many reasons but when it comes to local, data-based action, communities need to determine local conditions that play out differently from community to community. This is important in order to make the right choices in the set of strategies and interventions to implement that comprise a comprehensive plan that will result in real community change and improvements in health disparities.  Learn what local conditions data are, where to collect it, and how to analyze and use local data to determine what needs to change first to affect your long term outcomes.

Bill Geary, Ph.D., Technical Assistance Manager, CADCA National Coalition Institute

Dr. Geary assists the Deputy Director of Training and Technical Assistance in the mission of facilitating intensive, comprehensive technical assistance to coalition leaders and coalition teams, with particular emphasis on Drug-Free Communities grantees and Weed and Seed Communities. Dr. Geary has 15 years of teaching experience and has been a National Coalition Academy instructor for the past four years. While he has consulted with a variety of coalitions around the country on all aspects of coalition work with primary interests in community level and program evaluation as well as organizational health and development. He recently served as the Coordinator for a State run Weed and Seed project in Norristown, PA., and is the former Coordinator for a Communities That Care site in Abington, PA. Dr. Geary has also consulted to a variety of agencies over the past 15 years including school districts, police departments, probation/parole departments, and a variety of faith-based and non-profit organizations. He earned his Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Delaware and is published in a variety of venues.


Creating a Data Strategy: Building Staff and Community Capacity

The purpose of this workshop is to strengthen organizational capacity by introducing participants to the components of a data strategy. Generally, community-based organizations have a piecemeal approach to data collection, management, and reporting. The chaos of this approach is not always obvious, but the indicators are abound: inconsistent data, inability to integrate, little accountability, poor evaluation, and failure to receive funding. With a data strategy, staff will be able to optimize solutions to create successful programs. A large staff and/or budget are not necessary to translate data into real power. The presenters will guide participants through a process to evaluate his/her organizations current relationship with data and provide tools to begin to create a data strategy for success. This workshop will be an interactive work session. We will assess organizations current client tracking processes, and illuminate ways in which staff are already data collectors and managers. Participants will gain insight on how to evolve into an organization in which data works with/for them.

Sara Mokuria, MA, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Urban Policy Research at the University of Texas at Dallas

Ms. Mokuria holds a Master in Gender and Cultural Studies and an MAT in High School History from Simmons College. She has extensive experience in curriculum development, training, community engagement and community based participatory action research. Previously, she taught high school in Dallas and Boston, was an arts and academic integrationist for a nonprofit afterschool program, and  worked in several writing and training capacities including editing a handbook for family medicine residents. Simultaneously, Sara has done some private training and leadership development with grassroots youth and social justice organizations. Refreshing and engaging, Sara is able to make difficult content come alive in a thoughtful and often humorous way.    


Building community capacity to collect data on health disparities 

In this session participants will explore how to obtain data needed to address disparities including how to use relevant, existing data; how to produce their own local estimates when data is not available; and how to identify appropriate methods to collect their own data. Participants will also learn how to combine data sources and report their findings.   Disparity issues presented by participants will be used in creative problem solving exercises and discussions used in the session. Participants will have worksheets and references to take away for use at home.

Upon completion of the session participants will be able to:
1. Articulate the primary disparity question to be answered by data
2. Identify what type of data is needed
3. Identify secondary data sources
4. Identity appropriate methods to collect new data
5. Identify how to create and report local estimates using national and state level data when data is not available.

Peggy Toy, MA, directs Health DATA (Data. Advocacy. Training. Assistance.), a major public service program of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Health DATA's mission is to build community capacity to access and use health data in policy advocacy and program development through training and technical assistance. She also directs two community-academic collaborations addressing health disparities related to air quality. She previously directed capacity-building programs for the National Cancer Institute, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and the World Health Organization.


Useful Ways to Visualize and Analyze Data Sets

We will discuss the different visualization techniques (exploratory, confirmatory, presentation and interactive presentation). We will then show how each technique changes the approach taken when presenting data on a web page. We will then discuss best approaches. Each example will use Weave, the new open source freely available web-based analysis and visualization environment (see iWeave.org). We will also show examples of live Weave-based websites across the U.S.

Georges Grinstein, Professor, Computer Science Department; Director, Institute for Visualization and Perception Research; Director, Center for Biomolecular and Medical Informatics, University of Massachusetts Lowell

Mr. Grinstein is Professor of Computer Science at UMass Lowell, head of its Bioinformatics Program and director of its Institute for Visualization and Perception Research. His work covers perceptual and cognitive foundations of visualization, algorithms and applications. The emphasis is on the modeling, visualization, and analysis of complex information systems. He has over 150 research grants, products in use world-wide, several patents, numerous publications, data visualization books, founded several companies, chaired international conferences in Computer Graphics, Visualization, and Data Mining, is a member of the Homeland Security Center CCICADA, and co-director of the Open Indicators Consortium. 


Stronger Together:  Data Collaboratives and Partnerships

This session will provide a broad understanding of the possibilities for partnerships around data. Kathy Pettit, co-director of NNIP, will first describe one model of local data capacity - the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership. (NNIP), and give short examples of how NNIP partners work with their communities to address health disparities locally.

The NNIP model is more long-term for those in cities without partners yet, so Todd Clausen will focus most of the session will focus on immediate steps participants can take to forge data partnerships.
  • Identify the tasks that data may be able to help with, such as program planning, targeting, or evaluation
  • Understand the types of data available , administrative data ,program data, household or property survey data
  • Review potential data partners and strategies for approaching them (academic, nonprofit, private)
  • Learn from real-world examples from Milwaukee on partnerships to address child lead poisoning and others
In the final segment, we will do a collective problem-solving exercise where we ask select participants to describe their own organization’s needs and then walk through the elements above to develop a plan for the participant to consider for they return home (we may do one or two groups depending on the size of the session).


Kathryn L.S. Pettit
, Co-director, Urban Institute/National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP)

Ms. Pettit is a senior research associate in the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute whose research focuses on measuring and understanding housing markets and neighborhood change.  She is also a recognized expert on local and national data systems useful in housing and urban development research and program development.  She is Co-Director for the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership, and has recently led several projects on studying the impacts of foreclosures on families and communities.   Before joining the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Center, Ms. Pettit worked at the Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy where she concentrated on the analysis and documentation of I.R.S. data sources on nonprofit organizations.  She earned her Masters’ in Public Policy from Georgetown University.

 

Todd Clausen, Data Center Coordinator, Nonprofit Center of Milwaukee

Mr. Clausen directs the Neighborhood Data Center Program at the Nonprofit Center of Milwaukee and currently serves on the NNIP Executive Committee. Through training and consultation, Todd helps nonprofit organizations to increase their capacity to work with their own data alongside other public data sets to better understand the communities they serve. He is an advocate for GIS and management information systems (MIS) technology in the nonprofit sector, especially in the area of strategic planning and program evaluation. Todd also helps build a community perspective on key trends affecting Milwaukee neighborhoods, and is a member of the Milwaukee Mayor’s Foreclosure Partnership Initiative, the Community Justice Council and other local Milwaukee initiatives.Todd represents the nonprofit sector on the Wisconsin Geographic Information Coordination Council and has served as chair of the Housing Workgroup within the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership. He is also a frequent guest lecturer at Marquette University Law School, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Urban Planning Department and Alverno College.


Online Resources for Local Employment and Economics Data

This session will examine a wide variety of data on employment, income and poverty available at the local neighborhood level.  Designed for beginners and those not familiar with interactive data applications, we will combine the presentation with hands-on demonstrations of easy-to-use web sites designed to give participants tools they can use to quickly find relevant information, generate reports, and create other data products (maps, charts, tables) for use in their work.  Time for questions and answers to specific data needs will be provided as well.  Finally, we will also discuss the uses, benefits and limitations of the various data sources and wrap up with a guide to local resources that attendees can utilize back in their home communities.

Jeff Matson, University of Minnesota Center for Urban and Regional Affairs

is Director of Community Geographic Information Systems (CGIS) at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Urban and Regional Affairs.  Jeff and his team of research assistants provide technical support, mapping, and data analysis for community organizations and non-profits in the Twin Cities metropolitan area.  Jeff has a master’s degree in Geographic Information Science from the University of Minnesota where his research focused on environmental justice and public participation GIS.

 

Contact Information

Payment Instructions


  • General Attendees - $110.00
© 2017
Quick, easy and affordable online event registration and event management software for all event sizes.