ConFESS_2015

Vienna, Vienna
Tuesday, 14 April 2015
Room 1 Room 2 Room 3
Day 1: 2015-04-14
08:00
Day 1 - Registration and Breakfast
09:00
Day 1 - R1 - Session 1
09:00
09:00
Day 1 - R3 - Session 1
10:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11:00
11:00
12:00
12:00
12:00
13:00
Day 1 - Lunch
14:00
14:00
14:00
15:00
15:00
15:00
16:00
16:00
16:00
17:00
17:00
17:00
18:00
Day 1 - Open Space/Evening Event
18:00
Room 1 Room 2 Room 3
Day 2: 2015-04-15
08:00
Day 2 - Registration and Breakfast
09:00
Day 2 - R1 - Session 1
09:00
09:00
Day 2 - R3 - Session 1
10:00
10:00
10:00
11:00
11:00
11:00
12:00
12:00
12:00
13:00
Day 2 - Lunch
14:00
14:00
14:00
15:00
15:00
15:00
16:00
16:00
16:00
17:00
17:00
17:00
18:00
Day 2 - Open Space
Room 1 Room 2 Room 3 Room 4
Day 3: 2015-04-16
08:00
Day 3 - Registration and Breakfast
09:00
09:00
09:00
09:00
12:30
Day 3 - Lunch
13:30
13:30
13:30
13:30


Running a multitude of programming languages is a common requirement for large scale applications. This talk presents a virtual machine architecture that allows to handle different programming languages and their interoperability while not sacrificing performance. It bases on partial evaluation of AST interpreters to automatically derive compiled code. A prototype of this architecture has been developed as part of the Graal OpenJDK project (http://openjdk.java.net/projects/graal/) as well as the TruffleRuby, ZipPy, and FastR open source projects. The talk will be about the general principles behind our VM, special aspects of the Ruby, Python, and R implementations, and our vision for making language interoperability work efficiently.
Spring Cloud provides tools for developers to quickly build microservices using common patterns in distributed systems like configuration management, service discovery, circuit breakers, intelligent routing, micro-proxy and many more. This session introduces Spring Cloud along with other Frameworks like the Netflix OSS stack and demonstrates how to build application in a distributed environment.
JavaServer Faces provides a powerful infrastructure for building RIA applications rapidly with Java EE. Combined with PrimeFaces, JSF unleashes its true power. This session takes you on a tour of the latest version of PrimeFaces—featuring a rich set of components, powerful Ajax APIs, a mobile web RenderKit, dialog framework, client-side validation, a real-time push framework based on Atmosphere, themes, layouts, and extensions.
Javassist makes Java bytecode manipulation simple. At ZeroTurnaround we use Javassist a lot to implement the integrations for our tools. In this talk we will go through the examples of how Javassist can be applied to alter the applications behavior and do all kind of fun stuff with it. Why is it interesting? Because while trying to do unusual things in Java, you learn much more about the language and the platform itself and learning about Javassist will actually make you a better Java developer!
Docker is one of the hottest topics in the software world these days. It has the potential to be one of the most disruptive technologies in the IT world since the launch of Github. But Docker alone does not address the concerns of running, instrumenting, orchestrating, or debugging your applications code. That and much more is what Cloudfoundry can do for you. There are several strategies for using Docker and CloudFoundry together, all with their respective benefits and drawbacks. In this talk, we will explore these strategies and see how Docker in conjunction with CloudFoundry enables continuous deployment and allows to build a robust micro service architecture.
Spring Boot, the new convention-over-configuration centric framework from the Spring team at Pivotal, marries Spring's flexibility with conventional, common sense defaults to make application development not just fly, but pleasant! Ideal for microservices and for all your distributed systems and devops needs. Join Spring Boot committer Stéphane Nicoll for a look at what Spring Boot is, why it's turning heads, why you should consider it for your next application (REST, web, batch, big-data, integration, whatever!) and how to get started.
Arquillian Graphene has a nice feature called Page Fragments. You can encapsulate any repeating part in your screens and make it a reusable test component. You can define one test class for each widget but you can go even further if you start extending Graphene. You can verify the assignment of the component to an HTML element. For example, verify if you assigned a button test component to a button on the screen. Widgets can be complex in structure. It is interesting then to execute some code after the Page fragment is connected to the DOM tree for the first time. Your custom made interceptor can execute methods which are annotated with @PostConstruct. And it allows you also to define your own injection annotations, like a test component for handling browser alerts.
This session presents selected Spring Framework 4 feature highlights, with a focus on the recently released Spring Framework 4.1. Topics include Spring 4's comprehensive Java 8 story, its WebSocket support, and the latest caching and messaging features in Spring 4.1 - illustrated with component code examples and noteworthy design considerations.
NoSQL is not just about different storage alternatives such as document store, key value store, graphs or column-based databases. The hardware is also getting much more important. Besides common disks and SSDs, enterprises begin to use in-memory storages more and more because a distributed in-memory data grid provides very fast data access and update. While its performance will vary depending on multiple factors, it is not uncommon to be 100 times faster than corresponding database implementations. For this reason and others described in this session, in-memory computing is a great solution for lifting the burden of big data, reducing reliance on costly transactional systems, and building highly scalable, fault-tolerant applications. The session begins with a short introduction to in-memory computing. Afterwards, different frameworks and product alternatives are discussed for implementing in-memory solutions. Finally, the main part of this session shows several different real world uses cases where in-memory computing delivers business value by supercharging the infrastructure, e.g. to accelerate services, handle spikes in processing or ensure fault tolerance and disaster recovery.
If you are ever asked to convert, process and scale millions of real-world images using Java it will be a painful experience - at least it was for me. I came across unexpected problems ranging from CMYK, alpha-channel handling, multi-page TIFF, image compression algorithms, setting DPIs, PDF preview generation, decompression bombs to efficient image scaling. At hindsight I wished there was some single resource of information to guide me through my problems - and this is exactly the reason for this presentation. It provides real-life experience in replacing an ImageMagick/JMagick image conversion & scaling with a pure Java implementation covering Apache PDFBox, Java Advanced Imaging API (JAI), TwelveMonkeys ImageIO plugins, Sanselan (aks Commons Imaging) and different Java-based image-scaling libraries.
Big Data is often related to companies like Google, Facebook or Twitter. Indeed, 500 bilion tweets a day, 1,3 billion active Facebook users or 30 billion web pages to search, we're talking 'Big Data'. Many smaller companies have Big Data, too, without knowing it: application logfiles. This talk discusses how to use Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana to gain insight in these data. It also covers a real-world example at a major Dutch bank, including common pit falls, best practices and lessons learned. It also addresses how monitoring was done before using the ELK stack and what the major advantages are. After attending this session you will be able to leverage the power of the ELK stack for your own application. Even for smaller companies and applications, a lot of knowledge can be gained from proper insight in your production environment.
The last couple of years the focus on software quality is increasing. We use tools like Sonar to measure the quality, we write different kinds of tests etcetera. However the performance of the application is often forgotten. Companies do not test the performance at all, they use environments that cannot be compared with production, or they start measuring when the deadline approaches. Since the Java 7 update 40 Java Flight Recorder and Mission Control are shipped with the JDK. With these tools it is possible to profile an application not only on a developer 's computer, but also on production. The overhead of profiling with Flight Recorder is minimal, which allows us to use the profiler on any environment. These profiling tools are relatively new and unfortunately unknown to a lot of developers. This talk will give an overview of Java Flight Recorder and Mission Control so the audience can start profiling their applications afterwards.
Given the multitude of web application frameworks you have at your disposal, reluctance to adopt yet another one is understandable. Instead of simply introducing features that any framework can easily provide (asset/template compilation, hot reloading, convention over configuration, etc.), we will therefore focus on some governing principles. Non-blocking I/O will obviously play a major role in this talk, but so will some functional programming concepts, which, taken together, we'll use to outline an approach to Facebook's BigPipe architecture - and to possibly build a constant-memory, fully asynchronous HTTP proxy. Even if you know already that you won't use the framework any time soon, this talk will hopefully benefit you!
We want to find, quick and easy! This session focuses on integrating Solr, Elasticsearch as well as MongoDBs full text search into your application using the Spring stack. We’ll have a look on Spring Data’s abstraction for those datastores and the annotation driven development model it offers. Hands on code samples demonstrate how to make use of method name derived queries, custom document mapping and store specific annotations for highlighting, faceting and others. The combination with Spring Boot provides auto and XML free configuration. You choose the technology, Spring gives you tools to get going.

"The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war" - the US marines certainly know how to deal with the unexpected. Building resilient distributed applications is not an easy task and you better prepare for failure during development. In this talk you will learn how to build event-driven applications that are resilient from the bottom up, allowing you to deal with remote services that are failing, slow or misbehaving. Even if you are just consuming data from a database over the network, this talk is for you. The talk introduces different stability patterns and showcases them with real code, utilizing the fantastic RxJava and Hystrix libraries. Finally, you will see a resilient application in action, performing thousands of queries against a Couchbase Server 3.0 cluster while withstanding node failures and latency spikes.
Continuous Delivery and Deployment is a trend which every software project will follow sooner or later. Magazines, books and conference sessions praise it as a "Must-Have" but often leak in solving the most important obstacle: People. This session will cover the basics and provides solutions for integrating continuous delivery / deployment successfully in your Scrum team. Additional: - How can the QA dragon be tamed? - How does CD affect the common software roles (product manager, project leader, QA, developer) ? - How can CD be combined with Scrum and common release roadmaps?
Design your own Domain Specific Languages and plug them into Java easily. Think of all the business rules, workflow definitions, structured configurations or handy language extensions that you could simplify your life with. Using purely open-source tools and without defining a parser or grammar. JetBrains MPS gives you that and more – textual and graphical languages, non-parseable and tabular notations, tight integration with Java and full IDE assistance on top of it – the ability to edit, debug, refactor, test and analyze your DSL code right inside a Java IDE. If you’re thinking of trying something new, this session is for you.
Presenting the meanders of deploying your applications to Amazon Web Services (AWS). Using (hosted) Jenkins for building your artifacts and running them on Amazon is great, but the deployment process is not without hurdles. This talk shows some failed or suboptimal approaches and how to achieve a reliable and repeatable process. Additionally, we take a look at the security aspect while building and deploying, since you are facing different challenges than on your own infrastructure.
For a long time there was no unified component model in Java EE. Starting with EE-6 CDI does provide exactly that. But instead of trying to solve all current and future problems, CDI only focus on the core features and provides a flexible SPI to leave most of the integration to so called 'CDI Extensions'. The Apache DeltaSpike CDI Extensions project is one of the best known of this kind. It is the successor of Apache MyFaces CODI and JBoss Seam3 and contains many features of those two. DeltaSpike provides many great features to ease your daily work with JavaEE projects. This ranges from purely JavaSE core features to more elaborated Security, JPA and JSF integration. Many of it's features were later even taken to EE-7 and 8 specifications. With DeltaSpike you can get those features even in EE-6. Based on code samples I will show you the power of using DeltaSpike in your CDI based projects.
Building a Microservice is no hard task these days. With current frameworks it is fairly easy to create a self contained application that exposes Services via a RESTful interface. The Challenge for Microservices lies within the overall landscape: how to they interact with each other? How about service lookup? What about resilience? This session adresses the usual building blocks that are needed for Microservice landscapes and gives an overview of suitable open source frameworks in the market.
Java is the still the most widely used platform for enterprise software, yet when it comes to mobility, java developers don’t have a clear path which tools to choose. Well, not until now - Oracle Mobile Application Framework combines the power of HTML5 with the complete Java 8 (compact profile 2) stack for cross platform mobile applications. In this session we'll demonstrate some of the Oracle MAF capabilities: using native device features, implementing business logic with Java 8 and synchronising data over RESTful services.
Today, there are a lot of robots available which can be used to introduce kids and teenagers in programming. This session shows how some of these robots can be programmed: the Arduino-based Boe-Bot, the Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot and the NAO which is currently the most sophisticated humanoid for education. That'll be great fun - not only for kids but for adults as well, promise!
Alex, the Turtle, is lost and desperately waiting to be rescued. Due to the fact that the way is full of danger, the distance can be covered by a robot only. You are required as team (2-6 employees of a company or organization): Construct and program a robot vehicle that automatically finds the way to Alex, the Turtle, and provides it as soon as possible with a survival package. Before the contest, the speaker gives a 45-minute introduction about programming Lego Mindstorms EV3 with Java. So, the competition is suited for beginners too. One thing is guaranteed to all participants: Lots of fun!
The days of the web development platform may not necessarily be going away tomorrow, but there is no question that the next generation of application development is already upon us, and it’s all about mobile devices. An Enterprise Mobile Platform supports the development of mobile apps that connect to enterprise resources through a common shared scalable infrastructure platform. It hosts a well-defined set of APIs to access those resources, as well as enabling the use of services like push notifications, device management and geo-location that go hand-in-hand with mobile apps. Furthermore, interactions and operations must be secured using enterprise-grade security, employing proven protocols to satisfy even the most paranoid of corporate IT managers. In this session we will cover some of the basic features and characteristics of an Enterprise Mobile Platform. We’ll show how mobile app developers, server-side orchestration architects, and system resource administrators all play a role in the enterprise apps of today and look at the challenges of meeting the needs of all three in a mobile-focused age.
The software architectures are changing. In order to gain validated learning and reduce risk and uncertainty while developing new products one has to bring each increment into production. Only information gathered from behaviour of real users with each increment ensures that you build the right thing in the end. In this session you'll learn how you can stop building monolithic systems and start designing software based on microservices - each having its own lifecycle and being an independent deployment unit. You'll get a pretty good feeling about how to manage such distributed applications in production successfully as well. We'll use an online shop application based on microservices to discuss topics like deployment and operational questions like monitoring and logging.
JSF 2.2, included in Java EE 7, is the latest major revision in the stable standard UI technology for Java EE. As JSF has matured, other trends for solving the UI problem have emerged, as epitomized in the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS, NodeJS). Oracle is staying on top of these trends as evidenced in its continuing investment in Project Avatar. But what does all that mean for JSF? This talk will explore the evolution of JSF during the development of Java EE 8. We focus on the changes to JSF to enable the use of JSF native technologies such as Facelets in the new JavaEE MVC solution built in the JAX-RS specification. We will also examine some small-scale new features in JSF itself that allow for more reactive UIs. Session Summary (3500 chars max) ======= I. UI Trends A. State Department B. MEAN stack C. Project Avatar II. What this means for JSF? A. Jersey MVC B. State concerns 1. REST vs Action Oriented impedence mismatch III. What about Java EE 8? A. Oracle lead features 1. Polish Completing what was started in previous releases Ryan deLaplante's features. 2. Small scale new features a. Ajax method invocation b. multi-component validation c. End of the line for old stye JSF managed beans B. Community driven features: Kito and Ian's content IV. Preserving your investment in JSF A. Recap of JSF 2.2 new big features B. JSF and multi-tenancy: modular UI and functionality
Developing a native app for your business in the mobile age usually requires you to implement your client twice, once for iOS and once for Android. Of course, this also means twice the work and twice the maintenance effort. A number of frameworks exist that try to address this issue by building an app for multiple platforms from a single code-base, but they all struggle if you aim to adhere to the platform-specific UI principles. We examine a new approach introduced by Google with their Inbox app: Using a cross-compiler to translate Java code to native Objective-C code, only the business-logic layer shares a common code-base while the UI layer remains platform specific.
Are you wondering how Spring Boot is _actually_ working in the inside? No black magic here, but standard mechanisms to register beans according to the environment. Spring Boot supports many use cases already and it can also be extended to support your own! In this talk we are going to create a starter step by step (dependencies management, auto-configuration management, customization through dedicated keys, testing, etc). You can take this home and apply that to your own components; this will bring standard auto-configuration for **your** components with the ability to reconfigure that default behaviour if need to be.
Profilers are absolute beasts. And profilers might prove useful to pinpoint the performance issues in your Java applications. By using profilers, developers are fortunate to find the root cause of an issue at hand. However, it requires effort to actually comprehend the data collected by the profiler. Due to the inherent complexity of the data, one has to understand how this data is collected. And thus understand how the profiler actually works. During this talk we will go through the classic profiler features. What is a hotspot? What is the difference between sampling and instrumentation from the profiler point of view? What are the problems with either of those methods? What is the time budget of the application? And more! I will also showcase a new kid on the block among the profiling tools: XRebel. This tool provides insight into application behavior and permits the developers to discover application level issues.
Docker is an extremely popular and relatively new open source project. Docker is able to create containers from almost any application. A container based on Ubuntu with GlassFish and your favorite application is one of the many possibilities. The biggest advantage is that Docker containers can run almost anywhere. Docker containers can run on laptops, servers, but also on the Raspberry Pi. Docker is gaining quite some attention and popularity and some major cloud platform vendors already indicated that they want to support Docker. This presentation will explain the advantages of Docker and how Docker can be used on various devices such as the Raspberry Pi.
The Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) is a wordwide ISO standard not only to draw but also to execute business processes. As Java developer you should not be afraid of BPMN thanks to a new generation of embeddable workflow/process engines. This session gives a hands-on introduction into the Open Source camunda BPM platform - expect more live coding than slides. Furthermore I want to share insights of our real-life project experience, for example Zalando processing huge amounts of orders over the platform. Afterwards you are able to decide if and how you may apply camunda in your own (workflow) project.
Caching is relevant for a wide range of business applications and there is a huge variety of products in the market ranging from easy to adopt local heap based caches to powerful distributed data grids. Most of these caches are being promoted with examples from applications that have the luxury of having "eventual consistency" as a non-functional requirement. Most business / enterprise applications don't have that luxury. This talks aims at developers and architects that want to adopt a caching solution for their business application. I will present 15 caching patterns and best practices for these kinds of applications that address the typical questions being asked in that context. These questions might be: "what data can I cache?", "how to I handle consistency in a distributed environment?", "which cache provider to choose?" or "how do I integrate a cache provider in my application?". This talk comes with many live demos, some of them are run on a distributed cache cluster on Raspberry Pis.
While doing IT projects, we experience the fast and diversified software engineering world we live in. The demand on using latest tools and frameworks risks to influence the maintainability of a project in a bad way. Wait… did you said maintainability? Right! But what is maintainability actually? How can I measure and track it? And which benefits do I have when focusing on a high maintainability? At willhaben.at, one of the most important things is “Time to market”. In this session I will share my experience, creating high maintainable software components promising a very low time to market.
Life cannot possibly be imagined without smartphones nowadays. Therefore the importance of the mobile representation of your business or app can't be overstated. There are multiple ways to create mobile applications, all with their distinct advantages and disadvantages. In this session we'll take a look at native applications versus packaged web apps, as can be created using toolkits like Cordova, versus pure mobile websites. What's possible with each technique and where are the limits. Underpinned with lessons learned from each approach, you'll get an overview which will help you choose the most fitting platform for your next mobile project.
Groovy is a dynamic language that provides different types of metaprogramming techniques. In this talk we’ll mainly see runtime metaprogramming. You’ll understand the Groovy Meta-Object-Protocol (MOP), the metaclass, how to intercept method calls, how to deal with method missing and property missing, the use of mixins, traits and categories. All of these topics will be explained with examples in order to understand them. Also, you’ll see a little bit about compile-time metaprogramming with AST Transformations. AST Transformations provide a wonderful way of manipulating code at compile time via modifications of the Abstract Syntax Tree. You’ll see a basic but powerful example of what we can do with AST transformations.
During the last years the exceptions and needs of platform users have changed. Users are used to navigate with google maps, plan their routes only and find a shop nearby a certain location just with a couple of clicks. It is no longer enough to show a simple address. The users demand to be able to visualize this sort of data on a map, which does not only contain the location of the address itself but also environment information such as points of interests or other relevant information for the current context. This additional information can be gathered of different sources such as Open Street Map or data.gv. This talk will cover topics about collection of these data, data integration and presentation as a case study of the new maps features of willhaben.at that were launched the last couple of month.
This session is a deep dive as well as an interactive discussion on design principles, considerations, lessons learned from mistakes that can be taken into account when developing RESTful services. It will cover a variety of topics from Designing of RESTful resources, Versioning, Exception Handling, Caching, Validation, Security, Rate limiting, HATEOAS, Testing and Documentation. This talk will walk through and compare the different REST API provided by companies like Twitter, Paypal, Google, Stripe and more we can learn the good, the bad and ugly. So join me in this talk to build high quality applications that can be highly scalable, available and reliable.
Spring Data Solr, as part of the Spring Data family, aims towards simplifying data access to Solr for java application developers by easing the need of writing access structures for everyday tasks. The built in document converter already ships with mappers for eg. jodatime and allows to register custom type converters. The sessions touches Spring Data Repository configuration, CRUD support, the fluent query API. The live demo deep dives into method name derived queries as well as Solr specific support for faceting and highlighting and reveals how to build a webbased search application combining all the best of Spring Data and Solr.
The state of the art Javascript framework AngularJS offers a wide range of opportunities for rapid prototyping and building single page applications. The numerous features, the active community and flat learning curve are reasons for its rising popularity. When integrating AngularJS into enterprise applications, developers are faced with a variety of challenges to meet the business requirements. Depending on the scope, using AngularJS has an impact on different areas of the developing process starting from the architecture, design, build process up to the search engine optimization strategies or developing environment. In this talk we present pitfalls, our experiences and practises of using AngularJS based on a real world example.
Cloud computing opens new possibilities to scale applications from a small server into a global running environment. This session introduces different patterns and services on the AWS platform to scale applications based on the current user demands. Using technologies like docker containers, auto-scaling, caching, messaging and NoSQL data stores on the AWS platform this talks introduces a toolbox for developers to build cloud native applications.
In this talk we will take a look at one of the most currently hyped technologies - Docker containers. We will explore Docker and learn when a good time is to use them for your projects. Once we have some containers, we will learn how to deploy them. But wait, the fun doesn't end there! Once you have them deployed, we will explore some tips and tricks on how to make them highly available and scaleable to ensure a great end user experience.
Applications which exclusively rely on synchronous data access very often hit a scalability wall when things get slow and their thread pools are exhausted. New paradigms like reactive programming alleviate this and provide extensive toolsets to deal with the ever growing demands of web applications. This talk shows how to build scalable reactive and fault tolerant applications by making use of RxJava and the brand new fully reactive Couchbase Java SDK 2.0. We will also cover stability patterns to increase failure resiliency to be available, 24/365 be it under unexpected load spikes or server failures.
DevOps, the agile movement and Service-Oriented Architecture are changing the way on how to develop software. Now, a software developer is taking care of services through their whole life-cycle. With new responsibilities, new requirements arose. So how to achieve goals like high availability, centralized logging, concise documentation and automated deployment in highly distributed environments? Fabric8 is an open-source integration platform which combines proven open source software into a powerful and easy to use enterprise service bus. This session will give you an overview - including a live demo - on how Fabric8 can assist you defeating the complexities, which arise when accompanying your Microservices from development to production.
This session will show how you can use Swagger in combination with Spring REST to - provide a complete API documentation automatically - use the Swagger Javascript client to test your API - Update your client code using Swagger-Codegen (for generating clients with Java, PHP, Scala, ...)
The presentation introduces JSR 354 (Currency and Money). It will discuss the API from a user perspective, and gives details on the design decisions done. The presentation will demonstrate how the JSR models monetary capabilities, monetary amounts, currencies, roundings, financial arithmetics as well as formatting and currency conversion in a platform independent and flexible way.
This half day workshop covers the web tier of Java EE 7 with a view towards building HTML5 web applications. Topics include JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON, and JSF JAX-RS - Intro to REST - How REST principles inform the design of JAX-RS - JAX-RS basics. JSON - Why is this important? JSON is to HTML5 what XML was to web services - JSON-P is for parsing - What about binding to Java Objects? WebSocket - Three specs: JavaScript API, IETF transport protocol, Java API - Java API details: Usage from a browser, Usage from standalone client JSF: The good parts - Composite components - HTML 5–friendly markup
In this workshop, we will explore and learn how to deploy application to a public or private cloud using Docker containers. But wait, the fun doesn't end there. We will also learn how to manage and orchestrate the applications using technology such as Kubernetes. During this lab, we will be using an open source PaaS technology called OpenShift.
The frontend development eco-system is thriving - new buzzwords are coming up all the time. But what's behind all these things like Angular, Less, Bower, Grunt, Gulp, Node.js, NPM, ... This workshop will give you an insight into these state of the art web frontend development technologies. Where are they coming from, what are they doing, how to use them? We'll start off with an empty HTML file and build up a project stack using them. Based on the web app driving the info screens at the ConFESS we'll add feature after feature, explaining the used technologies along the way and end up with a typical modern web frontend stack. The perfect start to get to know these technologies, and the perfect primer to dive deeper into the topic during the "ConFeed with AngularJS" later that day, showing a larger scale "enterprise-ready" web frontend stack based on these technologies.
Netty is a popular open source library that greatly simplifies the development of network applications on top of the JVM. It abstracts the burden to deal with tedious low level details and allows you to concentrate on your business logic instead. It is uses by high profile companies like Red Hat, Twitter or Facebook and designed from the ground up to handle high throughput at low latency, even with thousands of connections at the same time.

In this workshop you are going to build both client and server using netty, which are communicating with each other in a completely asynchronous fashion. We are going to explore the netty pipeline, how you can reuse existing protocol handlers and how to write your own. After this workshop you never want to get back to blocking IO again!
This half day workshop is a complete tour of all the features of JSF, updated with the latest stable version, 2.2. Take a fresh look at the following features, presented in a cohesive and integrated short workshop. I. Views A. HTML5 Friendly Markup B. Resource Library Contracts C. Resource Libraries D Composite Components II. Navigation A. Implicit and Explicit Navigation B. Faces Flows C. Bookmarkable URLs III. Model A. Scopes and EL B. CDI IV. Application Level Concerns A. Performance B. Maintainability C. Design for localization
In this workshop we will discuss the mechanics of a reliable, scalable, and cost-effective deployment on AWS. This includes how to structure your network (VPC), the use of auto-scaling groups, and how to work with storage like EBS, Glacier, S3, or instance storage. Additionally, we will talk about Elastic Load Balancers and their limitations, how to save money by using reserved or on-demand instances, and how to monitor your servers and applications. While we will show some possible solutions, this should be very interactive — tell us how and why you are doing things differently and we will discuss varying scenarios and experiences!
What do you get if you combine: Java, Mobility, Raspberry Pi and Arduino? An incredible IoT platform, capable of delivering industrial or consumer solutions. In this workshop we'll walk you through how to create a remote controlled security robo-tank from scratch including how to implement the required server and mobile applications. The robot in action can be seen here: bit.ly/oraIoT
In this workshop we will create a basic feed app called “ConFeed” based on AngularJS where user are able to post messages to a central server providing a public REST API. Participants will implement missing parts of the application using the TypeScript language. Main topics of this workshop will cover routing between pages, token-based authentication, client side validation and directives. For handling TypeScript, styling and HTML files in an effective way we will also discuss the main steps of our build pipeline based on gulp.
 

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    Phone: +43 1 89053030

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      € 450,- for 2 fully packed session days.
      € 600,- for the 3rd day - the workshop day.
      € 1050,- for all 3 days.
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