21st Annual First Nations L.E.A.D. Institute Conference

Catoosa, Oklahoma
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Tentative Agenda: items are subject to change.
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

6 p.m. – 10 p.m.
Conference Reception
All Conference Attendees Invited 
Sky Room
18th Floor

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Registration - Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center
Vendors & Exhibition Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center
 
8 a.m. – 9 a.m. Breakfast Sky Room
18th Floor
9 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Morning Plenary
Michael Roberts, President, First Nations Development Institute – Opening
Eddy Red Eagle (Osage) - Opening Prayer
The Honorable Jefferson Keel, Lieutenant Governor, Chickasaw Nation
Sky Room
18th Floor
Workshops I:
10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
Deep Roots: Traditional & Medicinal Foods & Plants/Seed Saving

Pat Gwin, Administration Liason, Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
Brett Ramey, Coordinator, Northwest Native Plants and Foods Collective

Beyond their medicinal benefits, tribal communities have always relied on traditional plants for nourishment and subsistence. Efforts to cultivate and revitalize their significant role within local food systems continue including such techniques as seed saving.  Presenters will share information on how they are working to increase access and knowledge of traditional foods, plants and diets.
Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
$pending Frenzy – Show Me the Money!

Shawn Spruce, Consultant, First Nations Development Institute

This session will demonstrate the very popular interactive financial education tool – the $pending Frenzy workshop. The $pending Frenzy workshop allows youth to practice budgeting and spending money and helps them learn how to make financial decisions. This session will give attendees a chance to participate in the $pending Frenzy, and will provide information on how to conduct a $pending Frenzy in their home community.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions
Leadership Grounded in Wellness

Jillene Joseph, Executive Director, Native Wellness Institute (NWI)

There are many definitions of leadership, one being “to teach and inspire.” Whether you are an elected tribal official, executive director of a nonprofit, project manager, grassroots advocate, or other, this session will provide you with the opportunity to build your leadership skills in order to more effectively contribute to your work, your community, and Indian Country. The presenter and participants will embark on an introspective journey to learn and share about healthy communication, healthy conflict resolution, establishing healthy worksite norms and behaviors, defining concepts such as professionalism and respect, understanding where unhealthy behaviors come from, learning and building a sense of team and trust, and learning how to move forward in a productive way.

Sequoyah 3
12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Luncheon Plenary -

Dr. Henrietta Mann, Professor Emeritus, Montana State University

Sky Room
18th Floor
Workshops II:
1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
Food for Thought: Conducting a Community Food Assessment

A-dae Romero-Briones, Associate Director of Research and Policy First Nations Development Institute

A community food assessment provides insight into your community food system. It assists in identifying who has access to what foods, where the majority of food comes from, community spending on food and even what kinds of foods the community members would like to have on their tables. In this session, presenters will present their knowledge and experience in conducting a community food assessment. They will share their process for conducting a community food assessment, how they used the data generated to empower community members and gain tribal leadership support. They will also showcase community activities that have emerged as a result of the assessment. Upon completion of the session attendees will receive a copy of the First Nations Food Sovereignty Assessment Tool.
Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
Youth Success in Internships

Darryl Birkenfeld, Director, Ogallala Commons

This session will focus on the importance of creating internships and a program where the youth can see the impact of the work being done in their community. This will also focus on how to foster successful interns so they will gain valuable experience that they can take with them into future careers.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions
Community Engagement: Building Bridges for a Cause

Christine Diindiisi McCleave, Executive Officer, National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition
Shawn Partridge, Director, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Family Violence Prevention
Gena Timberman, Principal, Luksi Group
Montoya Whiteman, Senior Program Officer, First Nations Development Institute (Moderator)
Moving a community toward change and collaboration is community engagement that spans social, economic, cultural and political landscapes.  The speakers will show from understanding, skill and sensitivity, that engagement efforts are possible.  Join us as we learn how practices are improving people’s lives by leaders who are directly influencing and promoting community change to solve some of the most challenging problems in Indian Country.  They will share practical information on how to engage members of a community, describe ways to partner in change initiatives and give value to how mobilization is essential to organizations and programs.
Sequoyah 3
3:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Afternoon Break Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center

 
Workshops III:
3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
Planting the Seeds for Success: Food Strategy & Business Models

Joanie Buckley, Director - Internal Services Division, Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin
John Hendrix, Director of Economic Development, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians
Jackie Francke, Vice President - Programs & Administration, First Nations Development Institute (Moderator)

Understanding your business model and the impact you wish to achieve is important to developing a successful agri-business. In this session, attendees will learn first-hand how the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians have developed a sustainable business model for their agri-businesses. They will share best practices for engaging partners and community members, evaluating success and identifying the impact of their businesses in the community. Upon completion of the session, attendees will have identified first steps and strategies for developing their agri-business plans.

Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
Cultivating the Native Leaders of Tomorrow

Carnell Chosa, Co-Director, Leadership Institute at the Santa Fe Indian School
Corrine Sanchez, Executive Director, Tewa Women United
Native youth represent the future of Native communities, and their health and well-being determine the future health and well-being of a community overall. By investing in youth and giving them a sense of place and tradition, a community ensures that it will have bright and capable future leaders. But how do programs go about investing in youth and setting them on a road for success? In this session, presenters will share information about their programs and discuss some of their methods for empowering the Native youth leaders of tomorrow.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions
Government Grantwriting from A to Z: Successful Strategies for Fundraising Success

Alice Botkin, Development Officer, First Nations Development Insitute
Marian Quinlan, Consultant, Quinlan and Associates

Learn how to navigate the labyrinth of federal government grantseeking, from determining what grant programs might be appropriate for your organization and programs, to the nuts and bolts of submission online. We will cover how to find grant opportunities online, how to create a winning proposal, putting together a project budget, and the many, many required forms and attachments.  
Sequoyah 3

Thursday, September 29, 2016

7:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
8 a.m. – 4 p.m. 
Registration - Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center
Vendors & Exhibition Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center
 
8 a.m. – 9 a.m.

Breakfast

Sequoyah 1 & 2
9 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Funders' Panel -

Hester Dillon
Program Officer for Indigenous Communities, NoVo Foundation

Erin Hogue
Senior Manager, Walmart Foundation

Marisol Inzunza
Community Outreach Department - Manager of Operations & Grant Administration, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians

Michael Roberts
President & CEO, First Nations Development Institute

Marsha Whiting - Moderator
Senior Grants & Program Officer, First Nations Development Institute

Moderator Marsha Whiting will facilitate the panel’s discussion of what, why and how funders –
such as foundations, corporations and government entities – do what they do.
Sequoyah 1 & 2
Workshop IV:
10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
Quality Over Quantity: Food Policy & Safety

Janie Simms Hipp, Director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, University of Arkansas School of Law
Cynthia Boshell, Program Director, Northern California Tribal Court Coalition
Tribal nations are moving toward reclaiming healthy food access and food production, and an important part of exercising this sovereign power is through policy development. Food policy, safety and food codes are an important element in exerting food sovereignty.
Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
Digital Storytelling: Documenting Oral History, Tradition and Culture for Future Generations

Maria Arvayo, Director, Pascua Yaqui Tribe Development Services
Josephine Lee, Museum Director, Ho-Chunk Nation/Heritage Preservation
 
Oral histories, stories and the transference of traditional knowledge from generation to generation has always been a central part of American Indian culture. Digital storytelling provides Native youth an opportunity to explore their cultures, and gives them a connection to their roots and their communities — a key part of establishing their identity. In this session speakers will present their digital storytelling projects as part of the Native Youth and Culture Fund, and share the highlights, challenges and successes of working with Native youth and engaging them through digital formats.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions
Fundraising: Institutional Funder Research and Strategies to Build Strong Funder Partnerships for Native Nonprofits and Tribal Programs

Marian Quinlan, Consultant, Quinlan and Associates
Learn how to identify institutional funders – foundations, corporations, tribes, and government grant sources – that might support your organization and programs. We also will cover how to engage funders of all types, developing productive relationships and a successful fundraising process that will lead to sustainability.
Sequoyah 3
12 p.m. – 1 p.m.

Lunch - 

Ron Lessard, Chief of Staff, White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education

Sequoyah 1 & 2
Workshops V:
1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
Food Production: Greenhouses and Aquaponics

Nick Hernandez, Director of the Food Sovereignty Initiative, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation
Rebecca Spreitzer, Project Coordinator, Hannahville Youth Services
Nickolas Burns, Greenhouse Manager, Hannahville Youth Services

There are multiple methods of food production. This panel will explore two methods: greenhouse and aquaponics production. Two model programs in Indian Country will talk more about their methods, how and why these food production methods were chosen for their specific programs.
Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
Ideas to Empower Youth

Christy Finsel, Executive Director, Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition
Miranda Bush, Child Support Specialist II, Cherokee Nations Office of Child Support Services
Sara Quetone, Child Support Program Manager, Cherokee Nations Office of Child Support Services
Tami Lowery, Grants Director, Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
Michael Lowery, Grant Coordinator, Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

This session will cover financial tools available to empower Native youth.  The Children’s Savings Account (CSA) is an impactful program that helps youth learn the savings habit and also build a nest egg of savings over time. Oklahoma Native Asset Coalition’s Christy Finsel will provide an overview of the Children’s Savings Account program model.  Several Oklahoma tribes and nonprofit organizations will also report on pilot savings programs in their communities that are empowering youth.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions
Connecting the Dots for Your Constituents through Annual Report/Impact Statement Development

Randy Blauvelt, Senior Communications Officer, First Nations Development Institute
Catherine Bryan, Senior Program Officer, First Nations Development Institute
During this session, the trainers will outline the important role an annual report or impact statement can play in the governance of your organization or tribal program, as well as in your overall communications plan. In addition, the trainers will provide a refresher on the key components of an annual report/impact statement and best practices around the development of this document. The trainers will identify potential resources available to help you create and publish your annual report.
Sequoyah 3
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Afternoon Break – Outside the Sequoyah Convention Center  
Workshops VI:
2:45
 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Track 1: Nourishing Native Foods & Health
To Certify or Not to Certify? Exploring Tribal Organic Certification

John Hendrix, Director of Economic Development, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians
Miles McEvoy, Deputy Administrator, USDA, AMS, National Organic Program
Jennifer Vasquez-Koster, Meskwaki Food Sovereignty Initiative

In this session, we will review the process of organic certification beginning with initial considerations at the individual or tribal level to the exploring the necessary requirements needed for successful certification.  We will hear from the National Organic Program, a tribally owned organic farm, and a tribal producer going through the process of certification.  Each will offer insight into the organic certification process.
Sequoyah 4
Track 2: Investing in Native Youth
Preserving and Revitalizing our Sacred Languages

Richard Grounds, Executive Director, Yuchi (Euchee) Language Project
Trisha Moquino, Director, Keres Children's Learning Center

Language remains a central and core component of passing our traditional knowledge and culture on to the next generation. Many of the requests that come through First Nations’ Native Youth and Culture Fund incorporate or emphasize language as an essential part of youth programming. This session will help participants think strategically about the long-term language goals and needs in their communities. Whether it is the focus of your program or an added component, this
session offers clarity about what it takes to breathe new life back into your language, and provides ideas, methodologies and resources for language acquisition and revival among Native youth.
Sequoyah 6
Track 3: Strengthening Tribal & Community Institutions

Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families

Chris Hansen, Program Manager - Financial Education & Asset Building, First Nations Oweesta Corporation
Tawny Wilson, Program Officer, First Nations Development Institute

This session will be an introduction to the Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families 5th Edition (BNC) curriculum.  Whether members of a community want to start a business, buy a home, or pay off debt, personal financial literacy is the first step.  Native people have always managed resources wisely-whether it was fishing, harvesting wild rice, or other indigenous plants, or herding livestock.  This curriculum was designed to help Native communities adapt their traditional skills to the wise management of financial resources.

We will introduce this curriculum with an overview of each of the 6 sessions and demonstrate interactive activities that we as certified trainers use in the classroom, as well as introduce some of the supplemental materials that help make this curriculum the most widely used financial education program in Native communities.

Sequoyah 3
 

Contact Information

Payment Instructions

  • $400 - Standard Registration Rate 
    $50 + $100 craft donation - Native Craft Vendor
    $400 - Exhibitor
    $100 - Exhibitor Guest

    Payments accepted by credit card or check.  

    For Payments by Check:

    After registration please print a copy of your invoice and mail with payment to:

    First Nations Development Institute
    2432 Main Street, 2nd Floor
    Longmont, CO 80501

    Checks should be received by First Nations no later than September 19, 2016.



First Nations Development Institute 
2432 Main Street, 2nd Floor
Longmont, CO 80501
www.firstnations.org

 
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