Indianapolis, IN September 26-29 Lean Leadership Series

Indianapolis, Indiana
Tuesday, September 26, 2017


Can you articulate the financial benefits of your lean practices? Regardless of whether your organization is just starting out or has been practicing lean for years, at some point, you will want to know the return on your investment. 

This workshop will show the connectivity between the various types of lean tools, techniques, and concepts and how the benefits of using lean can be captured in both quantitative and qualitative financial aspects. A variety of approaches will be reviewed to demonstrate and practice how to capture the financial impact. Using your real-life examples, you will learn how to capture the benefits of lean. These benefits will also be connected to financial statements so, over time, you will know what leading indicators to monitor to validate improvement activities and where to prioritize other lean initiatives.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the qualitative and quantitative value of lean
  • Describe several approaches to capturing the value of their lean activities
  • Apply their specific situation to a profit model
  • Practice speaking in a common financial language
  • Observe where the financial benefits will and will not appear on the organization's financial statements over time

Faculty: Jean Cunningham
Date: Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Recommended Reading: Real Numbers: Management Accounting in a Lean Organization by Jean Cunningham and Orest Fiume
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical, nonclinical, and financial leaders across the healthcare industry
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Coaching for Improvement 

What competencies do leaders in your organization have to develop an organization filled with problem solvers? How effectively do they ask questions that support team members' growth as PDCA thinkers? For managers and executives in healthcare organizations, the daily, intentional development of their own coaching skills often takes a back seat to working on skills of a more technical nature.

Strong Lean leaders  have a balance of social and technical competencies. Capably coaching others is essential to developing PDCA thinkers at every level of the organization, and requires leaders to develop new habits and practices of their own. 
During this one-day interactive learning experience, participants will practice asking effective questions in service of others, discuss a coaching framework for developing others, and begin a plan for personal improvement using the framework of Personal Improvement A3 Thinking.


At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe coaching principles and applications
  • Practice the most fundamental coaching skill of asking effective questions
  • Describe other fundamental coaching practices and associated purposes 
  • Draft a beginning plan for ongoing personal development and improvement using the Personal Improvement A3 Thinking framework
Faculty: Katie Anderson
Date: Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Pre-reading: None
Recommended Reading: 
Humble Inquiry by Edgar H. Schein
Managing to Learn: Using the A3 Management Process by John Shook
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar
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Coaching for Personal Development 

How do you build a community of problem solvers?  You develop them. To create an organization filled with problem solvers at all levels, leaders must deepen both their technical competencies in problem-solving and their social capabilities of how to effectively develop others to become confident problem solvers.

During this one-day highly interactive workshop, you will learn how to more effectively support the personal development of others through practice and discussion. You will be exposed to the application of a lean problem-solving process as a coaching framework, how research on habit formation and brain science is aligned with A3/PDCA thinking, and fundamental coaching skills that will help you be more effective at developing others. The Personal Improvement A3 framework provides a structure for willing learners to identify their current condition and how their actions impact outcomes, uncover the root causes for their current habits, and develop a specific practice plan to get a little bit better every day. Using this framework, coaches can model effective lean leadership and coaching skills through catchball, and gain insights on how to best support their learner’s development.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how to use the personal A3 framework as a coaching process to support the development of new habits and behaviors
  • Explain the coaches' role throughout the Personal Improvement A3 process
  • Practice fundamental coaching skills such as asking effective questions 
  • Recognize some essential lean leadership behaviors and habits
  • Identify their own personal improvement opportunities and create a personal practice plan using the Personal Improvement A3 thinking framework

Faculty: Katie Anderson
Date: Thursday, September 28, 2017
Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Pre-reading: None
Recommended Reading:
     Managing to Learn: Using the A3 Management Process by John Shook
     Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling by Edgar H. Schein
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry

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Creating a Lean Management System Overview

Is your healthcare organization struggling to sustain improvement gained through the application of lean principles? Are you facing challenges to implementing daily improvement and aligning work to strategic goals?

Managing a lean organization requires a different type of leadership and a shift from management-by-objectives to management-by-process. A lean management system enables the adoption of management by process, regulates the flow of information from the front lines to senior leaders and back, fosters engagement of all employees in process improvement, and allows for daily coaching and teaching. During this overview session, participants will learn about a journey to develop a lean management system at a healthcare organization and experience an in-depth overview of the purpose of each element that comprises it.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose behind each of the 10 interconnected components of a lean management system
  • Describe how to cascade information effectively throughout the organization
  • Identify how to create and sustain a system of continuous improvement aligned with strategic goals
  • Discuss how employee coaching and mentoring can occur daily
  • Recognize and describe the importance of leader standard work in supporting a lean transformation
Faculty: Maryjeanne Schaffmeyer
Date: Thursday, September 28, 2017
Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Recommended Reading:
     Beyond Heroes: A Lean Management System for Healthcare by Kim Barnas
     Creating a Lean Culture by David Mann
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar

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Defining and Deploying Strategy

What does your organization aspire to? Do you have defined strategies that will help you achieve this aspiration? Developing strategic initiatives without regard to your current organization’s condition or alignment to True North is not an effective use of resources or of employees’ talents and skills.

Strategy is often thought of as a plan or vision. Discover how strategy is a set of choices that defines your path forward. Through this program, learn a framework to define and draft new strategies aligned with achieving your organization's aspirations or True North. Learn how to test your breakthrough strategy assumptions and develop fail-fast experiments. Balance these breakthrough initiatives with daily improvement to close the gap on True North, deploying priorities in a respectful way.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate how the organization's management system, continuous improvement, strategy deployment, and true north connect to focus and align work within the organization
  • Learn and practice the key components of Strategic Development in a lean organization
  • Describe how to apply the P-D-S-A cycle to develop clear, concise strategies to achieve True North
Faculty: Jeff Hunter
Date: Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am-4:00 pm)
Recommended Reading: Where's the Strategy in Strategy Deployment? free white paper by Jeff Hunter
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar

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Innovation in Healthcare

Is your organization struggling to adapt to value-based payment?  While this shift in payment is a threat to the current business model on which most health systems’ revenues are built on, it also presents an opportunity to design and develop radically different models of care delivery. This capability, referred to as care model innovation, is different from traditional lean improvement efforts such as kaizen events and daily continuous improvement. It requires different systems and processes that most health systems do not have today. Consequently, some organizations are struggling to deliver breakthrough results.

This workshop serves as an introduction to the care model innovation capability through the lens of the development and diffusion of the Care in Place program at Atrius Health, a large multi-specialty and primary care physician group in eastern Massachusetts. Atrius developed a repeatable care model innovation process and its first full innovation project resulted in the creation and diffusion of an elder urgent home care program, Care in Place. This new model reduced ER visits and hospitalizations while achieving excellent patient and provider experiences.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of the process, people, and space necessary for care model innovation
  • Recognize how care model innovation relates to enterprise strategy development and deployment
  • Explain the difference between process improvement and care model innovation
  • Describe how care model innovation relates to model cell development
  • Recognize the relationship between innovation teams and process improvement teams with regards to models of care delivery
  • Articulate how value-based payment creates an opportunity for innovation
Faculty: Ted Toussaint
Date: Thursday, September 28, 2017

Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Recommended Reading: 
     Healthcare Disrupted by Jeff Elton and Anne O'Riordan
     Winning the Brain Game by Matthew E. May
     How Atrius Health is Making the Shift from Volume to Value from Harvard Business Review by Ted Toussaint, 
Karen DaSilva, and John S. Toussaint
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar

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Kata: A Pattern for Continuous Improvement and Coaching in Healthcare


Have you struggled with developing a continuous improvement culture within your organization? Does aligning the work of each department with clarity around what they are trying to achieve in pursuit of True North and Strategy seem out of reach? Wouldn’t it be great if at each level of the organization a common pattern of improvement and coaching existed to assist leaders and teams in systematically achieving goals through rapid cycles of experimentation?  The truth is, current and future challenges require it.  A kata is a pattern or routine on your path to proficiency and expertise. With continuous improvement in healthcare, everyone has felt like a beginner at one point and many still feel that way.  Building competency around the pattern of continuous improvement and the required coaching to make it work is no mystery; it is a pattern that all can learn and begin applying immediately. 

In Toyota Kata, Mike Rother shares with us truly repeatable routines of improvement and coaching that have been missing in many improvement journeys over the years. Through practice within several healthcare organizations, we’ve learned much from Rother’s work—not only how to perform improvement daily within departments, but also how those efforts can be aligned closely with system priorities, engage people, and be truly continuous.  Within this course, we explore these patterns (kata), how these patterns link to scientific thinking and practice (A3), and provide basic routines for doing both rapid cycle experimentation and the coaching routine that is critical to success.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Review the A3 scientific thinking pattern
  • Describe and demonstrate a pattern for rapid cycle experimentation
  • Learn and practice a pattern for coaching to rapid cycles of experimentation
  • Employ and articulate the importance of setting short tern target conditions in alignment with a larger challenge
  • Create a plan of how to integrate these patterns into your improvement journey
Faculty: Mike Radtke
Date: Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Schedule: 1 Day (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Recommended Reading: 
     Kata in Healthcare free white paper by Mike Radtke
     Toyota Kata by Mike Rother
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar

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Principle-Based Transformation 

Have you been practicing a ”tool-based” transformation and wondering why it is not achieving sustainable results? The tools alone are not enough; people need to understand the “Why” behind the “How.”

In this one and half-day session, we will explore the two architectural methods for improvement: 1.) Tool-based architecture, and 2.) Principle-based architecture. Both are necessary in the evolution of your culture. Learn key concepts behind the principle-based architecture and how it is transforming other healthcare organizations. During the second day, you will have the opportunity to practice the observation of behaviors in a healthcare environment, and discuss which systems are supporting these behaviors.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the relationship between Behaviors, Principles, Systems, Tools, and Results
  • Identify key systems for your organization to Align, Enable, and Improve
  • Explain how to connect your Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to your Key Behavior Indicators (KBIs)
  • Examine performance and behaviors to identify system improvement opportunities
  • Identify roles and responsibilities for executives, leaders, and frontline staff
Faculty: Karl Hoover
Dates: Tuesday, September 26 and Wednesday, September 27, 2017
Schedule: 1.5-days Tuesday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm and Wednesday 8:00 am - 11:30 am
Recommended Reading: Management on the Mend: The Healthcare Executive Guide to System Transformation by John Toussaint M.D.
Recommended Prerequisite Sessions: None
Who Should Attend: Clinical and non-clinical leaders across the healthcare industry
Click here for complete information on CE credits, provided by MetaStar

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Contact Information

  • If you have any questions about the programs, location, or registration, please feel free to call our team at 920-659-7500.