Texas Master Naturalist 10th Annual Meeting & Advanced Training

Hunt, Texas
Friday, October 23, 2009


 13th Annual Statewide Meeting & Advanced Training
October 26-28, 2012

Early/Discounted Registration Deadline: Sunday, September 27, 2009
Late Registration Deadline: Sunday, October 11, 2009
ALL Registration Closes at midnight October 11th.

**********Extended Advanced Training Session***********


Back by popular demand-Rainwater Stewards Extended Advanced Training. This training will continue during designated AT times Friday and Saturday and precludes taking other described trainings offered those days.  Registrants participating in this training will receive certification as a facilitator for the following program upon completion of the required training and volunteer service hour commitment.  Due to the extensive materials and equipment provided to participants there is an additional $25 fee for this training (see registration page for details).

 

Extended Weekend Training:  Friday through Saturday

 

Rainwater Harvesting for Birds and Wildlife at Home and on the Land

Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas Parks & Wildlife and Texas A&M University staff


This hands-on training will address Rainwater Capture on the Land and in Containers. Methods of land health assessment, land management and restoration techniques as well as the education of youth and others to be stewards of the land will be introduced.  Rainwater capture for wildlife, landscaping and in-home use will be covered as well as construction of a wildlife guzzler, rain garden, small educational paired watershed plot and participants will construct a rain barrel and wildlife waterer to take home.  Participants will receive the Rainwater Harvesting training manual and resources and view current collection systems and construct a mock rain collection system to assist participants in installing on at their home county. Class limited to 30. (Additional course fee $25)

 

 

**********Friday Advanced Training Sessions **********

Registrants have an opportunity to pre-select one of the following training options for Friday

 

Fri 1:  Introduction to Wildlife Tracking  (Session is FULL)

Richard Heilbrun, Texas Parks & Wildlife Urban Wildlife


Intended for the beginning tracking enthusiast, this workshop will introduce you to the basics of animal tracking and give you the foundation to develop your skills on your own or through other workshops.  Considerable time will be spent on scat and track identification of native Texas mammals, though other animals will be presented and discussed.  Classroom topics will cover field identification of tracks and scat, and making track casts and replicas. Participants are encouraged to spend considerable in-class time learning tracks and making plaster casts.  (Class Limit 15)


Recommended text
: Tracks and Scat of the Desert Southwest by James Halfpenny (this text may be available for purchase while at the annual meeting too)

 

You may also want to see the follow-up course; Intermediate Wildlife Tracking offered on Saturday too.

 

 

Fri 2.  Sights & Sounds of the Night (continues after supper) (Session is FULL)

Craig Hensley, Nyta Hensley and Lee Ann Linam, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department


The night sky has long been a place of wonder and mystery. While we have used it to tell stories and honor heroes, tricksters and ancient gods, the dark of night sends us indoors. For many species of animals and plants, however, the nighttime is the right time for their activities, from the incredible after hours migrations of birds to the flowering of plants in hopes of attracting nighttime pollinators.  Biologists will introduce you to the nocturnal sounds of bats, birds and amphibians, through a combined afternoon and evening training. A classroom session will introduce you to the natural world as it comes to life after the sun goes down, provide a list of available resources, and explore opportunities for monitoring nocturnal animals. An evening field trip will allow us to practice call identification and explore the night sky.  Information will also be offered for chapters wanting to serve as partners in Texas Amphibian Watch, part of an important global monitoring effort for declining amphibians and new monitoring efforts for night birds. Bring a flashlight and clothing suitable for exploring at night! (Class limit: 25)

 

 

Fri 3.  Sharing What You Know:  Recruiting new members through educating your community  

Susan Nenney, TPWD Contract Marketing Specialist & Texas Master Naturalist Volunteer


People are moving to rural Texas faster than we can graduate Master Naturalists! Many new arrivals want to be good land stewards but don’t know where to start. Others need some consciousness-raising.  They need our help and our information!! So how do we boost recruitment to our training programs while also fostering a Master Naturalist mindset to others? By doing a more effective job of sharing what we know! Providing more community outreach will bring new volunteers and energize your current ones.  This workshop will focus on providing more community outreach of your chapter to bring new volunteers and energizing your current ones.  Plenty of discussion and examples- will focus on identifying your local outreach goals, finding audiences to fit your capacity (not everyone has to be a public speaker!), and building your presence in your community.

 

 

 

Fri 4.  Providing Interactive & Experiential Programs and Junior Master Naturalist Roundtable

Karen Marks and Nancy Herron, TPWD Outdoor Learning Programs


Whether you are speaking to an adult civic group or classroom full of third graders, learn how to make wildlife and environmental concepts come alive with hands-on activities.  Discover the rich resources of TPWD that will add pizzazz to your presentations! It’s that easy!! We will also discuss as a group the kinds of Junior Master Naturalist activities you are doing in your chapter along with your success and lessons learned so that we can all learn from each others experiences.

 

 

Fri 5.  Dragonflies & Damselflies (Both sessions are FULL)

James L. Lasswell, Co-Author “A Dazzle of Dragonflies”


Many Odonata are among the most glittering jewels of the entomological world--And the most successful! Their genetic pattern is an ancient one, as revealed by the time stained imprints of their gigantic wings and bodies fossilized hundreds of millions of years ago. Approximately 400-500 species are known in the U.S., with new species being described every year.  Come learn about their folklore, fossilization, life cycle, habits and the habitat of many Texas Odonata, including our own program logo - the Cyrano Darner!  If time permits, a field session and introduction to developing an electronic collection for other teaching opportunities using a simple flatbed scanner will be discussed.

 

Book Note:  “A Dazzle of Dragonflies” will be available for purchase while on-site at the conference.

 

 

Fri 6.   Using NRCS ‘WebSoilSurvey’ and Ecological Site Descriptions (Session is FULL)

Mark Moseley, Rangeland Management Specialist, Boerne, and NRCS staff


This training will utilize the Internet to demonstrate WebSoilSurvey which provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. The site is the single authoritative source of soil survey information. The system will allow you to select a geographic area of interest similar to other web based “locater” sites but provides specialized features for soils information. Each soil delineation is assigned to an ecological site description (ESD) that describe plant communities, climate, forage potential,  physiographic features and many more aspects of the local ecosystem.  Come learn how you can utilize these resources in your Master Naturalist projects and land management plans and recommendations. 



Fri 7.  (NEW ADDITION) If You Can't Name It, You Can't See It! - Plant Identification Walking Tour

An  outdoor walking session will be conducted to introduce volunteers to flora found on the property of Mo Ranch. Besides identifying plants, the walk will include information on the value of the plant, plant folk lore and where a plant fits into the processes of primary or secondary succession. The walk will be on flat grounds, uplands, hillsides and riparian areas. Participants should bring water, a good hat, walking shoes, insect spray, sun screen, a Naturalist daily notebook/journal for recording and an appetite to learn. (Class Limit: 30)

 

 

**********Saturday Advanced Training Sessions**********

Registrants should pre-select one or two of the following Saturday Advanced Training sessions. Select either one ALL DAY session or TWO HALF DAY sessions. Some sessions may have off-site field trips. When needed, transportation to and from the sites and sack lunches may be provided. All field trips will depart from and return to Mo-Ranch.

 

**********Saturday ALL DAY Training Sessions**********

Nature Realized:  Connecting Children to the Land (All Day Session

Jan Fulkerson, Texas Forest Service

This train-the-trainer session will enable you as a family member or influential adult to become the gate-keeper to youth’s opportunities through which to explore their environment.  You will be introduced to Richard Louv’s book Last Child in the Woods:  Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder which discusses the growing disconnection of children to natural resources and the land.  This training will prepare you to assist others in experiencing a higher quality of life by reconnecting them—youth and adults alike—to the land by 1) educating adults about the benefits of nature through research based information; 2.) learning to create an environment where participants can openly discuss challenges and fears together; and 3.) equipping other adults with basic outdoor knowledge and local outdoor resources to begin connecting children to nature with the ultimate goal to develop a strong conservation ethic in all participants as current and future stewards of the land.  You will engage in discussions, read articles, complete exercises and create a viable working plan to implement the goals of the program within the communities of your Master Naturalist Chapter.

 


MLMP:  Monarch Larval Monitoring Program (ALL DAY Session)

Dr. Kip Kiphart, Texas Master Naturalist Volunteer


Since 1997 naturalists and citizens from throughout the US have been part of the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project (MLMP), a Citizen Scientist effort to better understand the distribution and abundance of monarch butterflies. In this training you will learn about the methods and results of this project, along with how to become involved in collecting valuable data for this nation-wide program that helps scientists determine the health of monarch populations and factors that influence monarch numbers. You'll see tested examples of field- and inquiry-based projects that provide exciting and relevant learning opportunities for your audiences. Hands-on practice with methods of the project protocol, milkweed ecology and monarch biology, yearly life cycle, migration and over wintering will be included. Participants will receive the knowledge and tools to help them implement the MLMP or other monarch/habitat studies at their chapter locations. (Class Cap 20).

 

**********Saturday Half Day Training Sessions**********

When selecting the two HALF DAY sessions option, registrants will pick one AM Session AND one PM session to attend.

 

**********Saturday Morning HALF DAY Advanced Training **********

What’s New in Wildscapes for our Private Property State

Mark Klym Texas Parks & Wildlife Department


Texas
is a private property state.  Texans like the outdoors and often want to conserve our wildlife resources.  Understanding this, the Master Naturalist will understand the need for programs that assist the individual landowner who wants to protect habitat for wildlife.  This class will help the Master Naturalist take the message of our backyard habitat program to their community - whether they are helping their neighbor design a wildscape or convincing the community to conserve green space in a neighborhood park.  The program will also explore some of the changes that Wildscapes has made through the years.

 
 

WHEP—Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program

Larry Hysmith, Texas AgriLife Extension Service


In this training you will be introduced to the wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program (WHEP) which teaches youth about the fundamentals of wildlife science and management through their participation in various WHEP educational programs and contests.  You will improve your skills as a Master Naturalist in the area of wildlife habitat evaluation and enhancement for game and non-game species.  Program content also includes: identifying common wildlife species and foods, using aerial photography to evaluate habitat making on-site habitat recommendations for properties, constructing urban, rural, and wetlands habitat and wildlife management plans, the state WHEP contest and how you can help youth develop life and professional skills and contacts through your volunteer efforts assisting the WHEP program.

 

 

Intermediate Wildlife Tracking (Session is FULL)

Richard Heilbrun, Urban Wildlife Biologist, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department


Join us for a refresher course on wildlife tracking, as well as information on the science of tracking as the ‘next step’ or follow up to our Beginning Wildlife Tracking Training.  Topics will include track parts, discernment of a tracking scene, and the influence of gait, weight, animal health and soil type on animal tracks.  We will also extensively cover identification of mountain lion tracks and track photography.  It may be helpful to bring your camera for this training if you have one.  (Class Cap: 15)

 

Recommended text note:  Tracks and Scat of the Desert Southwest by James Halfpenny (this text may be available for purchase while at the annual meeting too)

 

 

Intro to Climate Change in Texas, Project Budburst and the National Phenology Network  (Session is FULL)

Dr. Wendy Gordon, Nongame & Rare Species, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department and Lisa Benton, National Phenology Network

           

How climate change will affect Texas’ wildlife and ecosystems is a question at the forefront of conservation in this state.  Collecting data and tracking trends in  organisms’ phenological behaviors are key to understanding the on-the-ground impacts of climate change.  Phenology is the study of life cycle events that are triggered by seasonal weather changes, such as the opening of flowers, the migration of birds and the falling of leaves in autumn months.  This session will cover the basics of climate change modeling and forecasts, describe potential impacts on wildlife and habitat, and summarize state and federal activities focused on mitigation and adaptation.  In addition, this session will introduce citizen science monitoring opportunities available through Project BudBurst (PBB) and the U.S.A. National Phenology Network (USA-NPN).  Participants will walk away conversant in climate change topics, and equipped to observe phenological events and learn how to report their data on both the PBB and USA-NPN websites.  Over time, data collected by citizen scientists will be used by researchers to determine the effects of climate change on plants, animals and ecosystems across the United States, providing valuable information for regional management and policy decisions.

 

Introduction to Insects in Nature (This session is FULL)

Drs. Michael Merchant, Professor and Extension Urban Entomologist, Texas AgriLife Extension; Chris Sansone, Associate Department Head and Extension Urban Entomologist, Texas AgriLife Extension and Michael Quinn, Invertebrate Biologist

 

This session will orient you to insects in nature by learning their structural characteristics, developmental biology, classification and ecology. You will learn the names and characteristics of the dominant insect orders, and how to make an insect collection. We will also delve briefly into the historical roots of the study of entomology and discuss answers to the age-old question of “what good are bugs?” Methods of collecting and photographing insects in the field will be discussed briefly. (30 class limit).

Class Note:  You may also be interested in the follow-up session that builds upon this training:  "Introduction to Insects Field Laboratory

 
Riparian Area Assessment and Management

Steve Nelle, Biologist, San Angelo and NRCS Staff

In this training, you will be introduced to the three aspects of riparian assessment – soils, vegetation and hydrology – and learn how the physical processes create a resiliency that will allow a riparian-wetland area to hold together during the various flow events. You will learn to make qualitative assessments of riparian areas that will help with land management decisions. This class will have a classroom and field component.  You may want to bring shoes and pants that can get wet/muddy if registering for this training.

 

*****Saturday Afternoon HALF DAY Advanced Training*****

 

Wildscape Volunteer Project at the Kerr WMA  (Off Site)

Mark Klym, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Get involved and earn volunteer service hours in an actual on-the-ground project while at the Annual Meeting!  Through this earn while you learn session, the group will design and implement an actual Wildscape Project from beginning to end at the Kerr Wildlife Management Area!  Bring clothes that can get dirty, sturdy shoes and work gloves for this option!!!  Shovels, light lifting and a little rock pickin’ will be involved!!!

 

 

Texas Nature Tracking on the Prairie

Heather Whitlaw, Lee Ann Linam and Marsha May, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Find out how you and your chapter can get involved in real research by monitoring populations of important critters of the Texas prairie. Lesser Prairie-Chickens are icons of healthy prairie systems and a portion of this session will provide you with information on the species’ ecology, habitat needs, and conservation and management challenges and opportunities. Learn about the Texas Horned Lizard, our Texas State Reptile, some recent research on the species, and how your chapter can get involved.  We’ll even do a practice session for horned lizard habitat sampling. We will also present an exciting watch program that involves monitoring an important keystone species of the prairie—the Texas black-tailed prairie dog. This classroom session will introduce you to two Texas Nature Tracker programs, Texas Horned Lizard Watch and Texas Black-tailed Prairie Dog Watch with additional information on how your chapter can get involved in Lesser Prairie-Chicken research.

 

WHEP—Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program

Larry Hysmith, Texas AgriLife Extension Service


In this training you will be introduced to the wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program (WHEP) which teaches youth about the fundamentals of wildlife science and management through their participation in various WHEP educational programs and contests.  You will improve your skills as a Master Naturalist in the area of wildlife habitat evaluation and enhancement for game and non-game species.  Program content also includes: identifying common wildlife species and foods, using aerial photography to evaluate habitat making on-site habitat recommendations for properties, constructing urban, rural, and wetlands habitat and wildlife management plans, the state WHEP contest and how you can help youth develop life and professional skills and contacts through your volunteer efforts assisting the WHEP program.

 

 

Intro to Climate Change in Texas, Project Budburst and the National Phenology Network (This PM session is FULL)

 Dr. Wendy Gordon, TPWD and Lisa Benton, National Phenology Network


How climate change will affect Texas’ wildlife and ecosystems is a question at the forefront of conservation in this state.  Collecting data and tracking trends in organisms’ phenological behaviors are key to understanding the on-the-ground impacts of climate change.  Phenology is the study of life cycle events that are triggered by seasonal weather changes, such as the opening of flowers, the migration of birds and the falling of leaves in autumn months.  This session will cover the basics of climate change modeling and forecasts, describe potential impacts on wildlife and habitat, and summarize state and federal activities focused on mitigation and adaptation.  In addition, this session will introduce citizen science monitoring opportunities available through Project BudBurst (PBB) and the U.S.A. National Phenology Network (USA-NPN).  Participants will walk away conversant in climate change topics, and equipped to observe phenological events and learn how to report their data on both the PBB and USA-NPN websites.  Over time, data collected by citizen scientists will be used by researchers to determine the effects of climate change on plants, animals and ecosystems across the United States, providing valuable information for regional management and policy decisions.

 

 

Introduction to Insects Field Laboratory  (Session is FULL)

Drs. Michael Merchant, Professor and Extension Urban Entomologist, Texas AgriLife Extension; Chris Sansone, Associate Department Head and Extension Urban Entomologist, Texas AgriLife Extension and Michael Quinn, Invertebrate Biologist


Concepts taught in the morning session will be demonstrated through a field trip providing participants the opportunity to actively observe, collect, and curate real insects with an emphasis on observing real insects and gaining experience as a field observer. Bring your boots, repellent and a camera if you have them (Class limit: 20). 

Class note:  You may be interested in also taking the complimenting AM session "Intro to Insects in Nature"

 

 

Intro to TWA and the LANDS Program

Koy Coffer, Texas Wildlife Association


In this session you will learn how you can become a partner and volunteer resource to the TWA’s Learning Across New Dimensions in Science (L.A.N.D.S.) curriculum enrichment program.  You will be introduced to the LANDS school curriculum and the importance of TMN volunteer assistance and partnerships in this program.  You will also be introduced to other teaching resources and educational activities available through TWA such as their education trunks covering 6 different natural resource topics for formal and non-formal educators like yourselves.  A hands-on field portion covering scent stations, nest predation, soils, plant ID and conservation management tools will allow you to become skilled and trained to assist with the program’s field days in various locations across the state as an instructor or assistant for the program.

 

**********Sunday Morning Advanced Training **********

 Registrants should pre-select one of the following Sunday Advanced Training sessions to attend.

Presentations: Creative Solutions to Common Chapter Problems (5-6 Presentations)
A:  Tierra Grande Chapter’s Success with a Unique Training Agenda for a Grande Region with a not so Grande Population

B:   Initiating and Carrying out a Training Class Project:  A North Texas Chapter ‘how to’ and lessons learned

C:   Forming Community Relationships:  The Capital Area Chapter’s Formula for Excellence
D:   Fostering Greater Chapter Stewardship:  A Galveston Bay Area Chapter “Stewardship Project of the Month” Success Story
E:   The North Texas Chapter’s Experience with Improving and Enhancing Annual Chapter Performance—another ‘how to’ and lessons learned.

 


 

Wind Development, Transmission and Texas Natural Resources   

Heather Whitlaw, and staff of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department


In 2007, Texas surpassed California in installed wind energy capacity, due to ample wind resources and strong state support for alternative energy development.  Today, the Texas Legislature has set up a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requiring that part of the state’s energy come from renewable resources (primarily wind).  For this to happen, Texas wind energy goals will require new transmission lines to carry the electricity generated by wind farms in rural area to urban areas.  In this session you will learn more about this rapidly growing technology; what the issues and impacts are to Texas land and natural resources; TPWD’s role in conserving those resources; current research priorities and projects; and what Master Naturalists can do to assist.  

 

 

Conducting Bats & Bridges Surveys  (Session is FULL)

Bob Gottfried, TPWD and Mylea Bayless, Bat Conservation International


TxDOT has literally thousands of bridges that they maintain that also serve as roosting habitat for Texas bats.  In previous years Bat Conservation International (BCI) surveyed these bridges for roosting activity; however, today they need your help.  In this training you will learn about the expansion of the Bats & Bridges Survey program; become trained and equipped to perform bat roost surveys at TXDOT bridge sites around the state during the spring and fall; and submit valuable data that these organizations could use to plan their bridge replacement activities in a way that will promote bat use. 

 

 

Know your Audience  

Mark Klym, Information Specialist, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department


As our communities expand and our population changes, the audience we are dealing with in our various classes and outreach sessions also changes.  Interests change.  Values shift.  At the same time the naturalist’s values have remained constant – conserving and protecting the critical resources and educating their community.  While the message remains the same, if the approach does not shift to meet the interests of the community, the program soon becomes stale and monotone.  So, how do I know what my audience is interested in so that I can make my program appealing?  We will explore some simple techniques that Master Naturalists can use to ensure their message gets wider appeal.

 

 


Monitoring Habitat for Quail and other Grassland Birds

Dr. Jim Cathey, Extension Wildlife Specialist, Texas AgriLife Extension Service.


Healthy wildlife populations need quality habitat.  So, what is quality habitat?  Does it differ among years?  To answer these questions, monitoring must be done.  In this session you will learn techniques with differing levels of intensity to establish and collect information that benefits grassland birds.  We will conduct field exercises to learn about fixed photo points, precipitation records, nest clump, cover, forb, grass, and grass stubble height surveys.  All of these can be adopted for use by the weekend wildlife manager or those who desire more understanding of habitat characteristics. (Class limit 30)

 

 

TMN Volunteer Project Presentations (3 presentations)

A:  Why Harvest Rainwater?:  The Rolling Plains Chapter’s Implementation of a local Rainwater Harvesting System.

      B:  Planning and Hosting a Regional Conference, North Texas Chapter

      C:  Highland Lakes Chapter’s Wood duck Nest box Monitoring Project at Inks Lake S.P.

 

 

Dragonflies & Damselflies (This session is FULL)

James L. Lasswell, Co-Author “A Dazzle of Dragonflies”


Many Odonata are among the most glittering jewels of the entomological world--And the most successful! Their genetic pattern is an ancient one, as revealed by the time stained imprints of their gigantic wings and bodies fossilized hundreds of millions of years ago. Approximately 400-500 species are known in the U.S., with new species being described every year.  Come learn about their folklore, fossilization, life cycle, habits and the habitat of many Texas Odonata, including our own program logo - the Cyrano Darner!  If time permits, a field session and introduction to developing an electronic collection using a simple flatbed scanner will be discussed.

 

 

Learning & Working with GroveSite

Diann Mitchell, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Information Technology


Come in-side and learn how you can share your out-side knowledge to educate the world about your chapter and our environment! In this session you will learn how to create a chapter website without having to learn programming code.  Create and share newsletters, on line calendars, share documents, files and pictures.  Help your chapter communicate and keep organized through this user friendly GroveSite program which requires very little training. This is a big plus when someone leaves the group, it’s easy for someone to pick it up and keep going. GroveSite allows you to choose your volunteer work time, its open 24/7.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Information

  • For Program and Registration questions:
    Call Michelle Haggerty 
    Phone: 830-896-2504
    Email: mhaggerty(at)ag.tamu.edu


    For Scholarship Confirmation,
    Questions and Registration Codes: 
    Call Sonny Arnold 
    Phone 979-845-1099
    Email:  sarnold(at)ag.tamu.edu
     

Payment Instructions

  • Registration Fees:

    Full Registration (Includes Ann. Mtg. + Accommodations & Meals

    Super Saver Bunkhouse Special $150 early/$190 late
    Fri-Sun, 2 or more Occupancy $195 early/$235 late
    Fri-Sun, SINGLE Occupancy (Single Rooms are SOLD OUT!!!)


    Daily/Commuter Registration (Includes Ann. Mtg & Meals)

    Commuter Fri. through Sun: $90 early/$130 late
    Commuter Fri-Sat or Sat-Sun: $80 early/$120 late
    Commuter any one day (Fri Sat or Sun):$60 early/$100 late


    Registration Add On(s)

    Extended Rainwater Harvesting Training $25.00 Additional Course Fee due to extensive materials provided.



    Registering and Payment:

    Registration is completed on line.  On-line payment is the quickest and preferred method.

    Payment may be in the form of Credit/Debit Card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa) or by check. However, on-line payment is the quickest and preferred method.   Registration--including admittance into the training sessions and preferred room accommodations--is confirmed and complete once full payment amount is received.  Should you not be able to complete your registration on-line you may call the program contact listed above for administrative assistance.

    If you are not able to pay on-line with a Credit/Debit Card you may pay by check.  When paying by check, registration in completed and confirmed once check is received.  All Early Bird Registration check payments at the discounted rate will need to be post marked by September 27th to avoid the late fee.  There will be a $30 charge for all returned/insufficient checks.

    1.  Make check Payable to:  "Texas AgriLife Extension -TX Master Naturalist Program"
    2.  In your check "Notes" section include:  Your Registrant ID number listed on your confirmation and receipt. 
    3.  Include a copy of your registrant confirmation and receipt
    4.  All check payments MUST be post marked by Saturday, October 10th, 2009
    5. Mail Check with a copy of your registrant confirmation/receipt to: 
    Texas Master Naturalist Program
    Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept.
    309 Sidney Baker South
    Kerville, TX 78028

    *********************************************
    The 2009 Annual Meeting is provided by the
    Texas Master Naturalist Program
    with support from:




    Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

    Texas AgriLife Extension Service

    The Magnolia Chritable Trust

    The Capital Area and North Texas Chapters
    of the Texas Master Naturalist Program

Texas Master Naturalists:  ...providing education, outreach and service dedicated to the beneficial management of natural resources and natural areas within their communities for the State of Texas.

Camp Allen--Navasota, Texas
October 26-28, 2012

The 2012 Annual Meeting is provided by the Texas Master Naturalist Program with support from:
Texas Parks & Wildlife Department
Texas AgriLife Extension Service
and the following Chapters of the Texas Master Naturalist Program:
Cross Timbers Chapter
Gulf Coast Chapter
Hays County Chapter
Hill Country Chapter

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