Description

May ​5, ​2017 ​Educational ​Conference
Synapses ​& ​Psychoanalysis
This ​continuing ​education ​program ​is ​sponsored ​by ​Yellowbrick ​Foundation ​and ​The ​Chicago ​Institute ​for ​Psychoanalysis. ​Yellowbrick ​Foundation ​will ​host ​the ​event. ​Registration ​is ​required. ​Registration ​Fee: ​$125.00.
 ​
Creativity ​In ​Psychotherapy: ​ ​An ​Adaptive ​Function ​Of ​The ​Right ​Brain ​Unconscious
Allan ​N. ​Schore, ​Ph.D.
Department ​of ​Psychiatry ​and ​Biobehavioral ​Sciences,
University ​of ​California ​at ​Los ​Angeles ​David ​Geffen ​School ​of ​Medicine

Within ​psychology ​and ​psychiatry ​there ​has ​been ​a ​long ​history ​studying ​creativity ​in ​not ​only ​people ​with ​outstanding ​achievements ​and ​those ​with ​mental ​disorders, ​but ​also ​as ​a ​personality ​trait ​in ​all ​individuals. ​In ​parallel, ​a ​large ​body ​of ​research ​within ​neuroscience ​highlights ​the ​essential ​role ​of ​the ​right ​hemisphere ​in ​creativity.  ​Indeed, ​very ​recently ​neuroscience ​authors ​are ​contending ​that ​the ​immense ​capacity ​of ​human ​beings ​to ​be ​creative ​can ​be ​gleaned ​from ​virtually ​all ​realms ​of ​our ​lives ​whenever ​we ​generate ​original ​ideas, ​develop ​novel ​solutions ​to ​problems, ​or ​express ​ourselves ​in ​a ​unique ​and ​individual ​manner. ​ 
Dr. ​Schore ​will ​cite ​both ​the ​neuroscience ​and ​clinical ​literatures ​to ​offer ​an ​interpersonal ​neurobiological ​model ​of ​creativity ​in ​the ​psychotherapeutic ​context, ​in ​both ​patient ​and ​therapist.  ​As ​examples ​he ​will ​describe ​the ​critical ​role ​of ​the ​clinician’s ​creativity ​when ​working ​with ​right ​brain ​affects.


Remembering, ​Forgetting ​and ​the ​Neurobiological ​Basis ​of ​Identity
Cristina ​M. ​Alberini, ​Ph.D.
Professor
Center ​for ​Neural ​Science ​New ​York ​University

How ​are ​memories ​formed ​and ​stored? ​Can ​they ​be ​changed, ​weakened ​or ​strengthened? ​ ​ ​What ​happens ​during ​the ​first ​few ​years ​of ​life ​when ​memories ​are ​formed ​but ​rapidly ​lost, ​thus ​leading ​to ​infantile ​amnesia? ​ ​I ​will ​discuss ​studies ​from ​my ​laboratory ​on ​the ​biological ​mechanisms ​of ​memories ​revealing ​very ​dynamic ​processes ​of ​memory ​storage ​and ​their ​critical ​modulation ​by ​emotions. ​I ​will ​discuss ​recent ​data ​indicating ​that ​infantile ​experiences ​are ​not ​forgotten, ​but ​stored ​in ​a ​latent ​form, ​and, ​in ​fact, ​they ​can ​be ​re-instated ​by ​recalls ​given ​later ​in ​life. ​The ​biological ​mechanisms ​underlying ​the ​formation ​of ​these ​latent ​infantile ​memories ​revealed ​the ​existence ​of ​critical ​periods ​of ​learning ​to ​learn ​and ​remember. ​These ​findings ​have ​important ​implications ​for ​the ​use ​of ​memory ​consolidation ​and ​reconsolidation ​in ​therapeutic ​settings, ​and ​for ​understanding ​how ​individuality ​is ​shaped.

The ​Enacted ​Unconscious: ​
A ​Neuropsychological ​Model ​of ​Unconscious ​Processes ​and ​Therapeutic ​Change
Efrat ​Ginot, ​Ph.D.

Integrating ​neuropsychological ​research ​with ​clinical ​material, ​this ​presentation ​advances ​a ​new, ​clinically ​relevant ​view ​of ​unconscious ​processes. ​This ​model ​explains ​how ​unconscious ​patterns ​are ​created, ​enacted ​and ​repeated. ​Most ​significantly, ​it ​explains ​the ​frequent ​difficulties ​encountered ​by ​patients ​as ​they ​struggle ​to ​attain ​emotional ​and ​behavioral ​growth. ​Therapeutic ​issues ​such ​as ​resistance, ​repetition ​compulsion ​and ​enactments ​are ​addressed ​in ​a ​fresh ​way. ​Recent ​neuropsychological ​findings ​indicate ​that ​unconscious ​processes ​underpin ​all ​brain/mind ​emotional, ​cognitive ​and ​behavioral ​patterns; ​they ​are ​pervasive, ​ongoing ​and ​influential. ​Significantly, ​the ​unconscious ​and ​conscious ​realms ​are ​closely ​intertwined.


Dr. ​David ​Daskovsky, ​Director ​of ​Training ​at ​Yellowbrick, ​will ​lead ​a ​panel ​discussion ​with ​the ​audience ​encouraging ​dialogue ​from ​everyone’s ​clinical ​experience.

Start Your Registration


You can also register a group.