Description

The ​capacity ​of ​language ​both ​to ​communicate ​truth ​and ​to ​manipulate ​perceptions ​of ​it ​was ​as ​vexed ​a ​problem ​for ​the ​Middle ​Ages ​and ​Renaissance ​as ​it ​is ​today. ​From ​Augustine ​to ​Erasmus, ​enthusiasm ​for ​the ​study ​of ​rhetoric ​was ​accompanied ​by ​profound ​concern ​about ​its ​capacity ​to ​mask ​the ​difference ​between ​authenticity ​and ​deceit, ​revelation ​and ​heresy, ​truth ​and ​truthiness. ​Even ​the ​claim ​of ​authenticity ​or ​transparency ​could ​become, ​some ​thinkers ​argued, ​a ​deliberate ​form ​of ​manipulation ​or ​“spin.” ​In ​our ​current ​era ​when ​public ​figures ​aim ​to ​create ​effects ​of ​immediacy ​and ​authenticity, ​this ​conference ​looks ​at ​the ​history ​of ​debates ​about ​rhetoric ​and, ​more ​generally, ​about ​the ​presentation ​of ​transparency ​and ​truthfulness. ​Taking ​an ​interdisciplinary ​approach, ​this ​conference ​considers ​the ​role ​of ​the ​verbal ​arts ​in ​the ​history ​of ​literature, ​law, ​politics, ​theology, ​and ​historiography, ​but ​also ​broadens ​the ​scope ​of ​rhetoric ​to ​include ​such ​topics ​as ​the ​rhetoric ​of ​the ​visual ​arts ​and ​the ​language ​of ​the ​new ​science ​to ​produce ​effects ​of ​objective ​access ​to ​“things ​themselves.” ​Plenary ​speakers ​will ​be ​Lorna ​Hutson ​(University ​of ​Oxford) ​and ​Dyan ​Elliott ​(Northwestern ​University).

Start Your Registration