Description

Investor-State ​Arbitration: ​Is ​There ​a ​Future?

Synopsis:
Investor-State ​Arbitration ​has ​been ​one ​of ​the ​most ​remarkable ​features ​of ​international ​law ​and ​international ​justice ​in ​the ​last ​thirty ​years. ​The ​period ​has ​seen ​a ​vast ​increase ​on ​the ​number ​of ​arbitrations, ​to ​the ​point ​where ​a ​State ​is ​far ​more ​likely ​to ​be ​involved ​in ​such ​a ​case ​than ​in ​proceedings ​before ​the ​International ​Court ​of ​Justice. ​The ​number ​of ​bilateral ​investment ​treaties ​under ​which ​most ​such ​arbitrations ​are ​brought ​now ​exceeds ​2,500. ​The ​ICSID ​Convention ​- ​largely ​moribund ​for ​its ​first ​twenty ​years ​- ​now ​plays ​a ​major ​role ​in ​the ​international ​legal ​system. ​

Yet ​recent ​years ​have ​seen ​a ​backlash ​against ​investor-State ​arbitration ​with ​some ​calling ​for ​its ​replacement ​by ​a ​standing ​court, ​while ​others ​have ​gone ​further ​and ​argued ​that ​disputes ​between ​an ​investor ​and ​the ​host ​State ​should ​be ​resolved ​by ​the ​courts ​of ​the ​State ​and ​that ​any ​form ​of ​international ​challenge ​is ​unacceptable. ​The ​evolution ​of ​the ​draft ​EU ​Singapore ​Free ​Trade ​Agreement ​and ​the ​recent ​Achmea ​Judgment ​of ​the ​Court ​of ​Justice ​of ​the ​European ​Union ​both ​bear ​witness ​to ​these ​controversies. ​

This ​lecture ​will ​look ​at ​the ​future ​for ​Investor-State ​dispute ​settlement ​in ​the ​light ​of ​these ​and ​other ​developments.

Start Your Registration